Archive for the ‘Life’ Category

Music Video of the Week

Enjoy this Growing List of Dr. John’s Favorite Music Videos Chosen Each Monday Based on Personal Preference and Reader Suggestions. “The music must inspire in a big way” said Murray.

•”MACK THE KNIFE” BY ELLA FITZGERALD
•”WATCHING THE WHEELS” BY JOHN LENNON
•”COME FLY WITH ME” BY MICHAEL BUBLE
•”RESPECT” BY ARETHA FRANKLIN
•”MY GIRL” BY THE TEMPTATIONS

•”LET’S DANCE” BY DAVID BOWIE

•”JOSIE” BY STEELY DAN
•”COMFORTABLY NUMB” BY PINK FLOYD
•”ONE OF THESE NIGHTS” BY THE EAGLES

•”AIR” BY BACH PLAYED ON VIOLIN BY SARAH CHANG
•”ANGIE” BY THE ROLLING STONES
•”AVE MARIA” BY ANDRE RIEU
•”PRELUDE FROM BACH’S CELLO SUITE NO. 1″ PLAYED BY ROSTROPOVICH
•”SULTANS OF SWING” BY DIRE STRAITS


•”PAPER DOLL” BY THE MILLS BROTHERS
• “ROUTE 66” BY BOBBY TROUP
• “MY FUNNY VALENTINE” BY TONY BENNETT
• “CHOPIN’S NOCTURNE OP. 9 NO. 2” BY ARTHUR RUBENSTEIN
• “TAKE THE A TRAIN” BY DUKE ELLINGTON
• “BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY” BY QUEEN
• “STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN” BY LED ZEPPELIN
• “IMAGINE” BY JOHN LENNON
• “WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN” BY LOUIS ARMSTRONG
• “YOU’RE A MEAN ONE MR. GRINCH” BY THURL RAVENSCROFT
• “JINGLE BELL ROCK” BY BOBBY HELMS
• “BALLERINA GIRL” BY LIONEL RICHIE

• “WE’VE ONLY JUST BEGUN” BY THE CARPENTERS
• “ALONE AGAIN” BY GILBERT O’SULLIVAN
• “WHAT KIND OF FOOL” BY BARBARA STREISAND AND BARRY GIBB
• “THE GREATEST LOVE OF ALL” BY WHITNEY HOUSTON
• “WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD” BY LOUIS ARMSTRONG
• “LET’S STAY TOGETHER” BY AL GREEN
• “LONG COOL WOMAN IN A BLACK DRESS” BY THE HOLLIES
• “HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE” BY THE BEATLES
• “THRILLER” BY THE LATE MICHAEL JACKSON
• “THE EVOLUTION OF DANCE” BY JUDSON LAIPPLY
• “THE LOOK OF LOVE” BY DIANA KRALL

MUSIC VIDEO OF THE WEEK BY DR JOHN F MURRAY

New Travel Category

Sports Psychology Special to JohnFMurray.com – Today we added a new category for articles, videos and audios related to travel with sports psychologist Dr. John F Murray.

Here is a link to the YouTube travel videos.

Hope you enjoy this emerging section on travel with a sports psychologist.

Postcard from Sweden

Sports psychology travel fun from Dr. John F Murray, a Palm Beach, Florida clinical and sports psychologist during his trip to Sweden.

Click here for your Postcard from Stockholm, Sweden

Hope you enjoyed this video from a sports psychologist

Visser set to become first female NFL analyst on TV

Sports psychology special report from Dr. John F. Murray: CBS SPORTS’ LESLEY VISSER TO BREAK NEW GROUND AS FIRST WOMAN ANALYST FOR NFL GAME ON TELEVISION

Lesley Visser, who is writing the epilogue for Dr. Murray’s new book “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History” will Serve as Analyst for New Orleans Saints-Miami Dolphins on Thursday, Sept. 3 on WFOR-TV in Miami

NEW YORK — CBS Sports’ Lesley Visser, voted the No. 1 Female Sportscaster of all-time by the American Sportscasters Association, is about to break new ground as the first woman analyst for a television broadcast of an NFL game.

On Thursday, Sept. 3, Visser will serve as a color commentator for the fourth quarter of the Miami Dolphins-New Orleans Saints pre-season game seen on WFOR-TV (Ch. 4), the CBS affiliate in Miami. She works the Dolphins pre-season games with Bob Griese, Nat Moore and CBS Sports play-by-play announcer Craig Bolerjack.

“Lesley Visser is one of the most accomplished sportscasters in history,” said Shaun McDonald, President/General Manager of WFOR-TV/CBS4 and WBFS/My 33. “She’s not only an inspiration for others and a pioneer in breaking down boundaries, but she also sets a standard that every other sportscaster aspires to achieve. Needless to say, we’re delighted that she’ll be contributing her expertise to our final preseason game.”

An example is Visser’s pioneer spirit is her support of sports psychology, as she recently had Dr. John F. Murray on her talk radio show with co-host Jeff De Forest on Fox Sports 640 AM to discuss innovative issues to help improve the NFL and NBA with better mental health care and mental training.

“Having had many challenges in my career, I am especially excited about this one,” said Visser, who was the NFL’s first female beat writer in 1976 when she covered the New England Patriots for the Boston Globe. “I am grateful to CBS for giving me this opportunity.”

This season, Visser, the only woman in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as the recipient of the 2006 Pete Rozelle Radio and Television Award, will be working her 36th year of NFL coverage. She will contribute to THE NFL TODAY, the CBS Television Network’s pre-game show, and cover her 23rd Super Bowl when CBS broadcasts Super Bowl XLIV on February 7, 2010 in Miami. Visser became the first female color analyst on radio when she worked selected Monday Night Football games for Westwood One with Howard David and Boomer Esiason in 2002.

This has been a special report from JohnFMurray.com, devoted to clinical and sports psychology.

Lesley Visser & Jeff De Forrest speak with sports psychologist Dr. John F. Murray on Fox Sports Radio

Sports psychology radio interview: Pro football hall of famer Lesley Visser and notable talk show host Jeff De Forrest of WFTL 640 Fox Sports interviewed Dr. Murray on August 28, 2009.
Click here to play the segment

Sports Psychologist Dr. John F Murray Launches New Podcast Tips on Mental Skills

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Hear All the Podcasts Here. They are Posted One Week After Appearing on Kiki Vale’s Radio Show Site in Chicago.

Palm Beach, Florida – July 21, 2009 – Athletes, business executives, sales associates, and performing artists just gained a new source of information and inspiration for their performances at work and play. Dr. John F Murray, clinical and sports psychologist in Palm Beach, Florida, today launched a new podcast program consisting of brief two minute sports psychology segments. The first show on confidence was posted today on Chicago radio show host Kiki Vale’s website.

“Kiki has had me as a guest on her popular Chicago radio show about six or seven times over the years we’ve developed a great rapport and friendship as we share the same passion for helping others with cutting edge advice. She loves sports psychology and I’m thrilled to be able to share my tips with her listeners,” said Murray.

Dr. Murray is the author of the best-selling book “Smart Tennis: How to Play and Win the Mental Game.” He has written hundreds of columns in popular magazines and appears on national television and radio to discuss the psychology of sport. Murray has been pegged “the most quoted psychologist in America” with almost daily contributions to thousands of newspapers including USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times. The Washington Post called Murray the “Freud of Football” and Tennis Week magazine called him the “Roger Federer of Sports Psychologists.”

Video on Mental Benefits of Stretching

Sports Psychology Tip #3 – John F. Murray, Ph.D. – Stretching before any athletic competition is very smart. The physical benefits are obvious, but what you might not realize is that this helps remarkably to relax the athlete and get them ready mentally too.

While on a coaching trip with my client Vince Spadea who was playing a tournament in Chicago in July, 2009, I spoke with him about how stretching helps him with his performance.

Enjoy this video at:

Michael Jackson Fame is Dangerous

Special to JohnFMurray.com – By John F. Murray – The recent loss of Michael Jackson is another tragic episode in the history of stardom, and perhaps our biggest loss to date. That Jackson was a musical genius is obvious. His fame as a performer is on par with or superior to Elvis, The Beatles, and The Rolling Stones. His influence on music and pop culture is immense and will continue to grow. While I never had the honor to meet him, I admired his music and was really amazed by his “Thriller” album in the 80s.

As a psychologist, I am aware that both negative and positive stress will kill if it is not managed effectively. We all know the game by now. We build up stars so that they rise in our eyes to an almost God-like status only to let them drop in a grotesque manner to the lowest point possible. Why do we enjoy promoting this tragic fall from grace in our culture? What does it say about our culture to desire these strange extremes?

The stress on the exhalted and then depreciated celebrity is usually unbearable. This is why they often turn to drugs or other dangerous escapes, and we all know countless stories of other musical geniuses cut short in their youth. Jackson making it to age 50 from this view is probably a long life, but since 50 is the new 30, Jackson still died way before he should have.

I have worked with incredibly wealthy and famous individuals who have no peace at all, and who ultimately succumb to their personal stress through any number of unhealthy activities. These super stars usually need psychological care even more than the rest of us mortals in society. Jackson liked children because he found that they were the only ones who told him the truth rather than what he wanted to hear. I have no way to know whether allegations of child abuse were true, but I choose to think they were false as he was not convicted, and because I would see the positive in people first before rushing to judgment. My friend in London, Uri Geller, was a close friend of Jackson for many years and served as his Best Man. Geller believes very strongly that Jackson was innocent. Here is a YouTube of Geller talking about Michael after shortly after his death.

In addition to being sad about this loss, I think we all need to learn from his death and maybe rush to judgment much less often when we are dealing with celebrities and stars who we assume are bulletproof. Being rich or famous does not mean you need less support, and often you need a lot more. My sense is that Jackson had a very sensitive personality and was ultra-vulnerable to stress.

Being a star rarely correlates with being “happy,” and it might even correlate negatively. Sorry, I am currently teaching a graduate psychology class that introduced statistics. It would be interesting to hear from some researchers who have looked into the personal cost of fame and may have reviewed the literature in this area. Extremes in either direction of total fame/celebrity or total poverty/loss are probably both equally stressful. So rejoice if you are just a normal member of society without those burdens.

The take home message today is that megastars need help too, and probably even more than the rest of us. Jackson appeared to have a wonderful heart, but that heart may have failed from the accumulated stress of what he had been through and what he was about to embark on with his new tour. Maybe that stress led to some kind of drug use or other self-injurious behavior that we will find out about after the autopsy reports.

In closing, I wouldn’t wish Michael Jackson-like celebrity on anyone close to me. Stars, if you are listening, take care of yourself and seek proper psychological care to survive in this crazy world. Normal people, take it a little easier on our gifted ones. Media, be a little more careful in who you raise up, only to drop down later. While I cannot speak of extreme fame or celebrity from personal experience, being around some of the rich and famous tells me that it is not all it is cracked up to be. It usually cracks a person. Long live Michael Jackson’s legacy. When it’s all said and done, he was a shining star whose light will continue brightly for another 100 years and probably more.

Fitness Magazine Covers Dr. Murray’s Walk Therapy

Palm Beach – February 16, 2009 – First it was the ancient Greeks who did it all the time, then the Wall Street Journal and National Post of Canada wrote about what Dr. Murray was doing with clients in Palm Beach, and in this month’s March 2009 issue of Fitness Magazine, Holly Corbett talks with Dr. John and espouses the benefits of mental health professionals walking and exercising with their clients!

You can read this Fitness Magazine article about a very healthy and therapeutic activity at this link

Life

This is a main category called “Life,” indicating that sports psychology and clinical psychology has wide application in almost everything that we do in life that is important.  Scroll down for the other headers or you can also click them on the right!