Archive for the ‘News & Events’ Category

MURRAY 4TH YEAR RUNNING ON BLOOMBERG RADIO

Dec 14, 2005 – Updated MPI Scores from NFL Playoffs. Bloomberg Radio is almost becoming the flagship station for Dr. John F. Murray each year before the Super Bowl.

Dr. Murray has been Invited as a guest to be interviewed for 4th Straight Year on Bloomberg Radio (Bob Goldsholl’s Bloomberg on the Ball) to Discuss NFL Teams Prior to Super Bowl and Give his MPI Ratings (showing total performance of teams including for mental factors, extremely accurate 3 years in a row now). Exact details and air times are forthcoming, but it has aired in the past on the Saturday before the Super Bowl 4-6 times throughout the day.

Bloomberg is heard in the New York metro area on WBBR and internationally on satellite radio. Dr. Murray’s MPI ratings and discussions prior to the Super Bowl have now been heard by over 500 radio stations and a handful of TV stations, and the MPI ratings have been more accurate than the official spread in forecasting the performance of the teams each year this has been done.

More information about the MPI can be found at the following Links:

MPI Article Derived from Radio Interviews on Bloomberg Radio and CNN Radio

Washington Post Calls Dr. Murray the “Freud of Football” in describing MPI

Football Section of JohnFMurray.com with many more articles and audios on the MPI.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PSYCHOLOGIST SELLS IDEA ON EBAY

AuctionBytes.com – Dec 8, 2005 – Ina Steiner – Sport performance psychologist John F. Murray auctioned the idea of “Confidence” on eBay. Bidding opened at $10, and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Other unusual items that have been listed on eBay include someone’s soul, someone’s virginity, and a house complete with a wife.

http://www.JohnFMurray.com

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRECEDENT-SETTING AUCTION OF AN ‘IDEA’ ON EBAY IS BOUGHT FOR $250

PALM BEACH, Fla. Dec. 8, 2005 – When sport performance psychologist John F. Murray decided to auction the idea of “Confidence” on eBay he had no idea how much interest this auction would draw. Top athletes and film stars use mental coaches, but he didn’t know whether the general public would pay for what might be called nothing more than an idea.

Bidding opened at $10 and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250, representing perhaps the first time an “idea” has been sold in an auction. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray. See http://www.JohnFMurray.com.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Many pro athletes, teams, businesses, and organizations receive the benefits of mental coaching, but most people are still often surprised to know that these services even exist as there are few legitimate performance psychologists or other professionals to provide these services.

Confidence is described as an umbrella term reflecting all the thoughts, feelings, actions and sensations reflecting self-belief and expectations of success. Top tennis professional Vincent Spadea spoke on national television about the benefits of mental coaching to reverse the longest losing streak in tennis history and return to top 20 in the world.

For more information about “mental training” and Dr. Murray go to http://www.JohnFMurray.com.

Contact:
John F. Murray, PhD
TEL: 561-596-9898
FAX: 561-805-8662
http://www.johnfmurray.com
SOURCE John F. Murray, PhD
-0- 12/08/2005
/EDITORS’ ADVISORY: Murray available for interview./
/CONTACT: John F. Murray, 561-596-9898, or fax, 561-805-8662/

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

WHY CHEAT IN GOING THE DISTANCE?

Newsday – Dec 6, 2005 – John Hanc – Honest runners say there’s no reward in taking shortcuts. John Hanc is a regular contributor to Newsday.

Janese Decal was driving home from work when she stopped at a Freeport bank to withdraw some cash. As she walked back to her car, a man on a bicycle came pedaling out of the darkness and tried to grab her pocketbook. When Decal resisted, he slammed her down on the pavement of Sunrise Highway before riding off with $260. Decal suffered a severe contusion on her left leg, a bruised femur and a gash in her head that required three stitches.

Three weeks later, against the advice of almost everybody, Decal completed the ING New York City Marathon. “It just meant a lot to me,” said the North Bellmore woman, who – because of her injuries – was forced to walk much of the 26.2 mile distance.

For the 26-year-old marathoner, part of the motivation to compete in the event comes from her involvement in the Long Island chapter of Team in Training, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s marathon fundraising group. To her, running represents a link to a network of like-minded friends, driven by a desire to go the distance, get in shape and, in the process, raise money for a good cause.

So when Decal heard that a group of women from a similar program was disqualified for cheating by cutting the course in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., she was horrified. “I don’t know how they could live with themselves after doing that,” she said.

A race for amateurs

With almost 20,000 finishers this year, the Marine Corps Marathon – held on Oct. 30, the week before New York’s – is the country’s fourth-largest 26.2-mile race. Unlike New York’s, it is a strictly amateur race; there is no prize money. Because of that, the event calls itself “The People’s Marathon.”

So what kind of people would cheat themselves?

At the center of the controversy is a Toronto-based group called JeansMarines, a nonprofit group that was founded by Dr. Jean Marmoreo and her husband, Bob Ramsay, after they completed their first Marine Corps Marathon in 2001. On its Web site, the organization describes itself as “a group of Canadian women who dare ourselves to do the impossible; to run the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. … no matter how fearful, reluctant or out of shape we were when we began. In the process … we change in ways we never thought possible.”

Cheating presumably was never part of the JeansMarines training program. Yet, that is exactly what the group admitted doing. Marine Corps Marathon race director Rick Nealis said eight members of JeansMarines – out of 200 from the group who participated in the race – were directed by Marmoreo to take a shortcut near the 10-mile mark and then to rejoin the race course at about mile 14. This would enable them to reach Washington’s 14th Street Bridge at mile 22 before the mandatory 51/2-hour cutoff time. (At that point, the bridge would open to vehicular traffic.) After taking the shortcut, the women supposedly continued on and completed the remaining 12 miles of the course. (Race organizers are also looking into allegations that another 22 members of JeansMarines also cut the course at a different location.)

‘We made a mistake’Nealis said he heard about the course-cutting from an eyewitness. He and his staff then analyzed the data from computerized chips marathon participants wear to keep track of their time and concluded that the eight women had, indeed, cut the course.

Meanwhile, when bloggers picked up the story and contacted her, Marmoreo called Nealis and admitted that she had encouraged her “Marines” to take the shortcut.

As a result, JeansMarines have been banned from participating in the 2006 Marine Corps Marathon. Marmoreo and her husband issued an apology on their Web site. “We made a mistake,” the statement read. “We’re sorry. And we’ve taken corrective action. … No shortcutting will be encouraged, allowed or tolerated.”

Marmoreo asked the eight women to return their finishers medals. “They feel they’ve accomplished a great deal in terms of fitness and weight loss,” said Ramsay. But “they certainly understand the reasons for [returning the medals].”

Others in the marathon world may not be as understanding. “The sport has gotten a bit of the black eye,” said New York City Marathon spokesman Richard Finn. “This raises the idea that [course-cutting] goes on more prevalently than it actually does.” Still, he says, “you shake your head and wonder why they did it.”

Decal says she can understand the urge to want to quit in the middle of a marathon, but not to cheat. “I was going to drop out at mile 16,” she said. “But I wouldn’t have walked back on the course further along in the race and then accepted a medal for doing less than the full distance. There’s no honor in that.”

To keep goals, set them wisely

To sports psychologist Dr. John Murray, the Marine Corps Marathon cheating incident, in which a group of eight back-of-the-pack participants admitted taking a 4-mile shortcut along the 26.2 mile course, illustrates an important point about goal-setting.

“Goals should be primarily based on performance and process and much less on outcome,” says Murray, who is based in West Palm Beach, Fla. “That helps put the sport where it should … as a healthy outlet for fitness.”

That’s worth remembering if you’re planning to set fitness and health-related “resolutions” for the New Year. A goal of “I will lose 25 pounds by mid-February” is not only unrealistic, it’s outcome-based.

A better and more achievable objective would be to go to the gym consistently or to make some specific dietary modifications and stick with them.

Here are some other goal-setting tips for fitness:

Set specific, short-term goals: “Looking and feeling better are good long-term goals,” says personal trainer and author Douglas Brooks.

A more tangible, short-term goal, he says, might be to exercise three times a week. “This is realistic and achievable and will serve to motivate you until you reach your loftier or more ambitious goals.”

Keep your workouts at reasonable lengths: There’s a tendency for people who are getting back into the gym to overdo it – to work out every night, for an hour or more. More often than not, that leads to injury and premature burnout.

Write down your goals and keep track of your progress: Studies have shown that people who keep a training diary are more likely to stick with a program.

Stay flexible, but stay with it: The Web site mygoals.com says that continual modification of our goals is now recognized as a key to reaching them. So don’t be afraid to adjust and amend your fitness goals. You don’t have to stick with the program, just make sure you stick with a program.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRESIDENT BUSH THIS WEEKEND

JohnFMurray.com – Dec 2, 2005 – News Update – Former president George Bush, 81, will play in Chris Evert’s charity event this weekend at the Delray Beach Tennis Center in South Florida. Bush, an avid tennis fan, is a longtime supporter of her tournament, which has raised more than $13 million to fight drug abuse and help neglected children. Others in the field include NBC Dateline anchor Stone Phillips, Grammy winner Michael W. Smith, actors Scott Foley, Alan Thicke and Jon Lovitz, and tennis players Lindsay Davenport, Tommy Haas, Mary Joe Fernandez, Justin Gimelstob, Vince Spadea and Luke and Murphy Jensen.

Dr. John F. Murray will attend the Friday night cocktail party at the Boca Raton Hotel and Club accompanied by a client.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

DR. MURRAY AND OTHER PERFORMANCE PANELISTS TO SPEAK AT MARATHON

JohnFMurray.com – Nov 30, 2005 – News Update – Sports Psychologist Dr. John F. Murray and other Performance Panelists from the Chamber of the Commerce of the Palm Beaches will be speaking this Saturday at 1:30 PM to entrants in the Marathon of the Palm Beaches. This will be held at the Hariett Gilman Theater in City Place, West Palm Beach.

Other panelists will include:

Patti Wilmoth, ACSM Fitness Institute, ACE, AFAA, ISCA Fitness Specialist

Cindy Collins, M.S., R.D., L.D./N., Licensed Nutritionist, Registered Dietician

Steve Sylvester, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, Orthopaedic Certified Specialist, Diplomate, American Board of Physical Therapy Specialist

Dr. Leslie Zebel, LMHC, Licensed Mental health Counselor

Dr. David Dyer, Director Oasis Therapy Center at Hippocrates Health Institute, Health Education and Restoration Specialist

Dr. Mark Ashley, Family Chiropractor

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

CONFIDENCE NOW AUCTIONED ON EBAY

JohnFMurray.com – Nov 30, 2005 – For Immediate Release – The Cowardly Lion received his medal for courage on the Wizard of Oz. Now, for the First Time Ever, Confidence is Auctioned on eBay. The age of mental skills training has fully arrived as eBay users can now bid on a one-hour mental coaching session aimed at teaching confidence, or any of 7 other critical mental skills important in success

Palm Beach, FL (PRWEB) November 27, 2005 — For the first time ever, a performance specialist in business, sports, academics, and healthcare is offering on Ebay a one hour mental coaching session by phone or in person aimed at teaching one of the 8 critical mental skills.

Bidding on Ebay starts at $10 and any amount above the normal fee for a one-hour session will be donated to charity. The item can be found on eBay here

Dr. John F. Murray, who authored the best-selling tennis book “Smart Tennis” (endorsed by world #1 Lindsay Davenport) and who works with busineses, healthcare personnel, NFL players, as well as professional golfers, tennis players, and other athletes, believes that it’s extremely important to get the message out about the benefits of training the brain.

“We’ve gone as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” stated Murray. “With the mind, limitations are always self-imposed,” added the doctor.

Bidding starts at $10 and the winner will receive one hour by phone or in person. It should be made clear that this hour is not for psychological counseling or psychotherapy, but rather for a mental teaching session focused on one of the following mental skills: confidence, focus, energy control, goal setting, imagery, enjoyment, resilience or discipline.

Many pro athletes, teams, businesses, and organizations receive the benefits of mental coaching, but the general population is still often surprised to know that these services even exist, as there are few legitimate performance psychologists or other professionals to provide these services. “It’s truly a cutting edge science and profession, says Murray, but the benefits have been demonstrated time and time again.”

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

HOLIDAY PUT ON HOLD

{Note: Congrats to Matt Hasselbeck and Seattle! Click to Go to Super Bowl Ratings … you might be surprised to read what the MPI shows this year}

The Oregonian – Nov 24, 2005 – Geoffrey C. Arnold – The NFL’s demands alter how a family with two quarterbacks celebrates Thursday, November 24, 2005

Matt Hasselbeck will see his brother, Tim, this weekend, but they will not be eating turkey or sipping eggnog to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday.

The exchange of greetings Sunday instead will occur across Qwest Field as the Seattle Seahawks play host to the New York Giants.

Matt is the starting quarterback for the Seahawks; Tim is a backup quarterback for the Giants.

Like many families with professional and college athletes, the on-field meeting will be about as close as the Hasselbeck clan will get to enjoying time together during the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

“A lot of families get together for Thanksgiving. Ours is a little different,” Matt Hasselbeck said. “We are not really going to get to hang out. It will be good to see him. I haven’t seen him in a long time so it will be fun and a little weird at the same time.”

It’s the combination of divergent schedules, travel and team obligations that prevents many athletes from gathering with their families during the holidays. However, like the Hasselbeck family (father Don Hasselbeck played nine seasons in the NFL), they know it comes with the territory.

It’s part of the reality of high-level sports, says Dr. John Murray, a sports psychologist who has worked with professional football athletes.

“Obviously, there are sacrifices. At the same time, there are enormous benefits to being in that line of work,” said Murray, who added that it’s important that family members and spouses understand the situation.

“It’s extremely difficult and you have to choose a partner that understands that and can deal with that.” Murray said.

Of course, watching a family member on television can help ease the pain of not having someone around on Thanksgiving.

“You have someone who is going to play on national television. In many ways, the family accommodates to that,” Murray said. “They realize what they’re dealing with and they realize it’s a short career.”

That’s what the members of the Harrington family of Portland can do today as the Detroit Lions play the Atlanta Falcons in one of the NFL’s two traditional Thanksgiving Day games. Joey Harrington, who grew up in the Laurelhurst neighborhood, plays quarterback for the Lions.

But he won’t be the only Harrington missing from the dinner table for sports-related reasons.

Another son, Michael, a quarterback at the University of Idaho, had to remain on the Moscow campus for practice during the week. He hopes to at least join his family, in spirit, by watching the Lions-Falcons game.

“Hopefully, we won’t practice when he’s playing,” Michael Harrington said.

The other NFL game today is Denver at Dallas, and the NBA has two games today: Cleveland at Indiana and Seattle at the Los Angeles Lakers. The NHL has three games today: the New York Rangers at Atlanta, Los Angeles at Nashville and San Jose at Vancouver.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

No Fear

Nov 21, 2005 – Choking is universal, says Dr. John F.Murray, a clinical and sport performance psychologist in West Palm Beach Florida (http://www.johnfmurray.com). Everyone has experienced it, even the best athletes in the world such as Tiger Woods will choke occasionally, but he does it less frequently.

Typically with choking, a person perceives the event as extremely important, and their focus turns inward, becoming internal rather than appropriately external, he notes.

Their brain starts firing off too much, causing them to lose that smooth and automatic level of physical skill that usually characterizes their performance. They become much less fluid, not only in their performance, but also in their thinking. They become distracted by those internal sensations and thoughts. Its like tunnel vision. Choking is always a self-inflicted problem.

Having counseled U.S. Olympic springboard diver Michelle Davidson, and many other elite athletes, Dr.Murray is keenly aware of what transpires in pressure situations:

During practice youre just kicking balls, but in the Super Bowl with two seconds left and youre in position to make a winning field goal, an inappropriate focus arises, disrupting motor skills, even though youve done it a million times, and can do it in your sleep. Choking is very much a disorder. Athletes choke on too many thoughts, whereas panic is the exact opposite. In panic you lose all your thoughts. Its a non-thinking process. Choking occurs at a very high level of sophistication in which we over think, over analyze and we over worry. Its a different process then panic, but both lead to performance failure.

Chokings complexity is apparent in a groundbreaking Australian study that found a connection between pre-competitive anxiety and depression. Researchers theorize that many athletes equate happiness with success. Among their conclusions, certain individuals are vulnerable to depression because they utilize inappropriate strategies to set and pursue life goals (e.g., winning a sporting contest) If the athlete believes that happiness and wellbeing are conditional upon goal achievement, any thoughts of goal pursuit will be accompanied by a belief that the individual is not yet happy or content. This negative self-focus…is in turn likely to cause an increase in depression levels.
One of the studys authors, Professor Kerry Mummery, director of the Centre for Social Science Research at Central Queensland University in Rockhampton, Australia, explains the significance of their findings: We believe that goal linking is an often overlooked source of pre-competitive anxiety. High-level athletes who link their happiness to their next level of achievement simply fail to stop and smell the roses. They habituate to the recent success very quickly, set new challenging goals and tell themselves that they will only be happy.

Dr. Mummery and his colleagues drew on the views expressed by participants in the 2001 New Zealand Ironman competition.

Typically, athletes who set conditional goals are more likely to experience high levels of anxiety before competition, which can negatively impact their performance.

For the most part any anxiety is a bad thing, notes Dr. Mummery. Arousal and anxiety are subtly different. Athletes need to achieve their optimal level of arousal to ensure top performance, but anxiety is normally associated with a reduction in performance. Worry or anxiety negatively affects the concentration on the task at hand and has associated physiological responses that impair performance. I agree that maladaptive self-talk is often the basic problem that leads to choking. Focusing on the outcome, rather than the process (I need to make this putt, versus this is what I need to do to make this putt), often leads to sub-par performances in situations where the athlete would normally expect to perform well.

According to Dr. Murray, pre-competitive anxiety is not gender biased, but is more readily apparent in those who exhibit obsessive traits. He identifies the best possible mind set for athletic success: The ideal mental state is to have no fear, and a complete excitement for competition. Love that even above winning. Competition is what you have to love, irrespective of outcome. Easy to say, harder to do.

Let the Head Games Begin:

To help his clients stay cool under pressure, Dr. Murray employs these helpful relaxation techniques and imagery:

Imagine yourself mastering very difficult situations before important competitions: Envision an imaginary miners lamp on top of your head. Choking is when you turn the lamp towards yourself; proper performance is when you turn the beam outward. Rather than get caught up in your thoughts, get focused on the environment.
Utilize a process of self-examination: I talk about chronic and acute causes of anxiety Athletes need to know and understand how arousal and anxiety affects them personally then incorporate a positive habitual routine into their pre-competitive preparation This is done over years of development with the assistance of a good coach.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

TIMID MICE MADE DARING BY REMOVING ONE GENE

New York Times – Nov 18, 2005 – Benedict Carey – Scientists working with mice have found that by removing a single gene they can turn normally cautious animals into daring ones, mice that are more willing to explore unknown territory and less intimidated by sights and sounds that they have learned can be dangerous.

The surprising discovery, being reported today in the journal Cell, opens a new window on how fear works in the brain, experts said.

Gene therapy to create daredevil warriors is likely to remain the province of screenwriters, but the new findings may help researchers design novel drugs to treat a wide array of conditions, from disabling anxiety in social settings to the sudden flights of poisoned memory that can persist in the wake of a disaster, an attack or the horror of combat.

The discovery may well prove applicable to humans, the experts said, because the brain system that registers fear is similar in all mammals. Moreover, the genetic change did not appear to affect the animals’ development in other ways.

“Potential clinical applications could be quite important” for people with “fear-related mental disorders,” said Dr. Gleb Shumyatsky, an assistant professor of genetics at Rutgers, who led a team that included investigators from Columbia, Harvard, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Brain scientists who were not involved in the study said the study’s finding was unexpected.

“The way I see it, there are three types of studies in science: one that moves a theory along, one that closes it and another that opens a new door altogether,” said Dr. Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, which helped finance the research. “This one opens a new chapter, introducing an entirely new molecular candidate for the study of anxiety, and we’re going to be hearing a lot about it in the next 10 years.”

The researchers found the fear-related gene by analyzing brain tissue, in particular the tiny prune-shaped region called the amygdala, which previous studies had shown to be especially active when animals and humans were afraid or anxious. They found that a protein called stathmin, produced by the stathmin gene, was highly concentrated in the amygdala but hard to detect elsewhere in the brain.

Using genetic engineering, the scientists removed the gene from mice and bred a line of the animals, all missing the same gene. Those animals developed into normal adults, as far as the researchers could tell, and learned as ably on standard tests as a group of normal mice.

In one test, they learned to expect a small shock to their feet after hearing a loud tone.

“They looked normal,” Dr. Shumyatsky said. “They weren’t stupid. They would run away if you tried to pick them up.”

But when presented with the same loud tone 24 hours later, the genetically engineered mice froze in place – a standard measure of learned fear – only about 60 percent as long as the control group.

When left alone on an unfamiliar white surface, the engineered mice also spent about twice as long exploring as did the normal mice. This “open field” test is standard measure of innate caution.

To be sure that it was the gene change and not some other quality that explained the differences, the researchers tested hearing and pain sensitivity in the altered mice. Both were normal.

In the paper, the authors suggest that stathmin, the protein that the engineered mice were missing, may help brain cells form new memories in the amygdala, where unconscious fears appear to be stored. (Conscious memories are filed elsewhere.)

In theory, a drug that inhibits the activity of stathmin could prevent or slow that process. That, in turn, might blunt the impact of traumatic experiences in people who are vulnerable to disabling memories of those experiences.

Reducing stathmin activity in the amygdala might also allow people to overcome innate or learned anxieties. Dr. Shumyatsky said doctors already had a drug that acts on the same brain molecules as stathmin does; it is Taxol, a cancer drug.

Taxol works throughout the brain, however, and not exclusively in the amygdala, which the new study suggests is the best target.

“It would be very interesting to study things like this, but it is still very early,” Dr. Shumyatsky said. “This study is only a first step.”

Still, it is a step that could take the study of fear in a new direction. In an e-mail message, Dr. Joseph LeDoux, a neuroscientist at New York University wrote: “While we are a long ways away, it is possible in the future that we will be able to identify amygdala-specific genes that can be used to play a role in amygdala-specific drug therapy. Studies like this are the kind we need in order to get to this point.”

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.