Archive for the ‘News & Events’ Category

PALM BEACH SPORT PSYCHOLOGIST ADDS WALK THERAPY AS OPTION

Dec 19, 2005 – JohnFMurray.com – Palm Beach based sport performance psychologist, has found that walking during sessions is beneficial and has added this to his treatment options. The Lake Trail where he walks is rated among the top 10 walking destinations in the world.

See The Press Release with a Photo of the Famous Walking Trail by Clicking Here

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

DR. MURRAY INTERVIEWS ARTHUR SCHOPENHAUER

Dec 17, 2005 – JohnFMurray.com – Feature – The famous philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer once stated that each new truth in history passes through three stages: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. And third, it is accepted as self-evident.

For many today, the truth about sport psychology and high performance psychology has entered the third phase. The benefits of the profession are accepted as self-evident.Â

Throughout history, good new ideas gained momentum slowly. But once they got going they were impossible to stop.

If you’ve read this far you are obviously a smart person and interested in how high performance psychology can help and how this progressive field can be introduced to more people.

We’ve already heard from Schopenhauer. Now I’d love to hear your views about what can be done to let more people know about the benefits of legitimate sport psychology services in helping athletes perform better and live more fulfilling lives.

I hope you are enjoying the many articles on this website. Keep sending me your great comments, or call me personally to discuss at 561-596-9898. Reach me by email: johnfmurray@mindspring.com.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

SIX DEGREES OF RESIGNATION

Dec 15, 2005 – SI.com (Inside the NBA) – Andrew Lawrence – In the NBA, Retiring is Only a Prelude to Returning – Former Miami Heat coach Stan Van Gundy now appears to have his priorities in order. At an age when most NBA coaches are hitting their stride, Van Gundy, 46, is calling it quits, abruptly resigning this week as coach of the Heat after 2 1/4 seasons.

His plan is to spend more time with a family with whom — between travel, practices and games — he was only going to spend an estimated 49 days this season. While 49 days at home with the wife and kids might seem like hard time to some, for Van Gundy the hard times came when he looked up into the American Airlines Arena stands and saw his 11-year-old son, Michael, waving to him in the distance. Or when his eldest child –14-year-old daughter Shannon — celebrated another birthday, reminding him of the few years he has left with her until she leaves the nest.

“I can’t believe that people have a big problem believing that someone would actually want to spend time with their family,” Van Gundy said at his farewell news conference. “I don’t know why that’s so hard to buy into.”

Perhaps because we’ve seen it before, seen the coach or player leave the sporting stage to spend more time at home, only to roll our eyes at the speed at which family soon retakes its place behind coaching or playing.

Almost six years ago to the day, Danny Ainge reached a similar crossroad when he resigned as coach of the Phoenix Suns to spend more time with his wife, Michelle, and their six children. When one of his sons (then a teenager) chided him for becoming too distant, “I couldn’t disagree with him,” Ainge said then. “It really [came] down to wanting to make a statement to my family that they are more important than my career.”

That lasted three years, at which point Ainge reunited with his other family, the Boston Celtics (the team he called home for eight seasons as a player), as its executive director of basketball operations.

When Ainge resigned in Phoenix, he entrusted the Suns to his top assistant, Scott Skiles, who at 35 became the NBA’s youngest head coach. In the six years since, Skiles has stopped working only once — not that it was by choice. (He was forced out after a 25-26 record in 2002.) Last year he led the Chicago Bulls to their first playoff berth since Michael Jordan left the building.

And both times His Airness left the building, it was for the family — or so he told us. When Jordan first retired in 1993, he regretted having not left sooner, admitting that his father, James, had urged him to hang ’em up after the Bulls had won their first title two years earlier. “Now that I’m here, it’s time to be a little unselfish in terms of spending more time with my wife and kids,” Jordan said. The following spring he was in Birmingham, Ala., shagging flies for the Barons before rejoining the Bulls near the end of the ’94-95 season.

When Jordan retired again in ’98, it was to give the carpool another driver. “Now I just want to enjoy my time with my family and friends, just recapture some of the time I gave away,” he said then. But in the end, the only thing he’d recapture was fame, joining the Washington Wizards in 2000 as president of basketball operations and suiting up for them in 2001 as a player.

When Jordan retired for the final time in ’03, the terms were much different. No one could blame him for going home; his wife, Juanita, had filed for divorce a year earlier. (They eventually reconciled in February ’02.)

Jordan hasn’t been the only former Bull willing to trade NBA fame for family. After Chicago’s sixth title, in ’98, coach Phil Jackson jetted off with his first wife, June, to Turkey, before retiring to his ranch in Montana. He didn’t stay there long, signing on with the Lakers in 1999. But there he was five seasons later, headed out the door again, this time flanked by four of his grown children after losing in a blowout to the Pistons in Game 5 of the NBA Finals. “They were hoping I could win a 10th [title] and retire,” Jackson said after the game.

They didn’t need to wait long for him to try again when Jackson re-signed to lead the Lakers last June.

“The problem with coaches and athletes is the perfectionism that pervades their personality,” says sports psychologist John F. Murray. “Nothing against family — you need family. But eventually they’re going to be itching for something more challenging.”

It was an issue Steve Kerr would struggle with after ending his 15-year playing career in ’03. “I was actually a little depressed for the first couple weeks,” says Kerr, a married father of three. “Which is ironic because I was usually depressed because I had to go through training camp. It’s sort of like a death of an era of your life. It can be sort of tough to move on.”

Kerr eventually settled into life after basketball; a job as an NBA analyst for TNT has allowed him to keep a hand in the game and also have enough time to lend a hand to his wife, Margot, in raising children, Nicolas, Madeline and Matthew.

Likewise, Jeff Van Gundy, Stan’s brother, used a career in television to tune out the chaos that had come with coaching in New York. He, too, retreated to TNT after resigning from the Knicks in midseason (citing a lack of focus after dealing with the deaths of two friends in the Sept. 11 attacks). When Jeff told his five-year-old daughter Mattie of his sudden plans to resign, she, like most New Yorkers, was shocked. “Does this mean you get to have lunch with me?” she asked. Of course, her father eventually returned to the bench two years later with the Houston Rockets.

Meanwhile, Uncle Stan will fill out his hours hunting around Miami for holiday lights for the house. This Christmas will mark Stan’s first at home in almost a decade. It should be a welcome change of pace for a man whose life has been consumed by the game from the start — the penance for being born the son of a coach. When Stan was 11 and his father, Bill, was too sick to scout his next opponent, the task fell to Stan, Jeff and their mother, Cindy, to watch the game and write the report. When he returns to the Heat, it’ll be as a consultant who scouts free agents and college players. More important, it’ll be less time-consuming. “I don’t think they need me, to be quite honest,” Van Gundy said of his young brood. “They’re doing fine without me. But I need them.”

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

MURRAY 4TH YEAR RUNNING ON BLOOMBERG RADIO

Dec 14, 2005 – Updated MPI Scores from NFL Playoffs. Bloomberg Radio is almost becoming the flagship station for Dr. John F. Murray each year before the Super Bowl.

Dr. Murray has been Invited as a guest to be interviewed for 4th Straight Year on Bloomberg Radio (Bob Goldsholl’s Bloomberg on the Ball) to Discuss NFL Teams Prior to Super Bowl and Give his MPI Ratings (showing total performance of teams including for mental factors, extremely accurate 3 years in a row now). Exact details and air times are forthcoming, but it has aired in the past on the Saturday before the Super Bowl 4-6 times throughout the day.

Bloomberg is heard in the New York metro area on WBBR and internationally on satellite radio. Dr. Murray’s MPI ratings and discussions prior to the Super Bowl have now been heard by over 500 radio stations and a handful of TV stations, and the MPI ratings have been more accurate than the official spread in forecasting the performance of the teams each year this has been done.

More information about the MPI can be found at the following Links:

MPI Article Derived from Radio Interviews on Bloomberg Radio and CNN Radio

Washington Post Calls Dr. Murray the “Freud of Football” in describing MPI

Football Section of JohnFMurray.com with many more articles and audios on the MPI.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PSYCHOLOGIST SELLS IDEA ON EBAY

AuctionBytes.com – Dec 8, 2005 – Ina Steiner – Sport performance psychologist John F. Murray auctioned the idea of “Confidence” on eBay. Bidding opened at $10, and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Other unusual items that have been listed on eBay include someone’s soul, someone’s virginity, and a house complete with a wife.

http://www.JohnFMurray.com

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRECEDENT-SETTING AUCTION OF AN ‘IDEA’ ON EBAY IS BOUGHT FOR $250

PALM BEACH, Fla. Dec. 8, 2005 – When sport performance psychologist John F. Murray decided to auction the idea of “Confidence” on eBay he had no idea how much interest this auction would draw. Top athletes and film stars use mental coaches, but he didn’t know whether the general public would pay for what might be called nothing more than an idea.

Bidding opened at $10 and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250, representing perhaps the first time an “idea” has been sold in an auction. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray. See http://www.JohnFMurray.com.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Many pro athletes, teams, businesses, and organizations receive the benefits of mental coaching, but most people are still often surprised to know that these services even exist as there are few legitimate performance psychologists or other professionals to provide these services.

Confidence is described as an umbrella term reflecting all the thoughts, feelings, actions and sensations reflecting self-belief and expectations of success. Top tennis professional Vincent Spadea spoke on national television about the benefits of mental coaching to reverse the longest losing streak in tennis history and return to top 20 in the world.

For more information about “mental training” and Dr. Murray go to http://www.JohnFMurray.com.

Contact:
John F. Murray, PhD
TEL: 561-596-9898
FAX: 561-805-8662
http://www.johnfmurray.com
SOURCE John F. Murray, PhD
-0- 12/08/2005
/EDITORS’ ADVISORY: Murray available for interview./
/CONTACT: John F. Murray, 561-596-9898, or fax, 561-805-8662/

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

WHY CHEAT IN GOING THE DISTANCE?

Newsday – Dec 6, 2005 – John Hanc – Honest runners say there’s no reward in taking shortcuts. John Hanc is a regular contributor to Newsday.

Janese Decal was driving home from work when she stopped at a Freeport bank to withdraw some cash. As she walked back to her car, a man on a bicycle came pedaling out of the darkness and tried to grab her pocketbook. When Decal resisted, he slammed her down on the pavement of Sunrise Highway before riding off with $260. Decal suffered a severe contusion on her left leg, a bruised femur and a gash in her head that required three stitches.

Three weeks later, against the advice of almost everybody, Decal completed the ING New York City Marathon. “It just meant a lot to me,” said the North Bellmore woman, who – because of her injuries – was forced to walk much of the 26.2 mile distance.

For the 26-year-old marathoner, part of the motivation to compete in the event comes from her involvement in the Long Island chapter of Team in Training, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s marathon fundraising group. To her, running represents a link to a network of like-minded friends, driven by a desire to go the distance, get in shape and, in the process, raise money for a good cause.

So when Decal heard that a group of women from a similar program was disqualified for cheating by cutting the course in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., she was horrified. “I don’t know how they could live with themselves after doing that,” she said.

A race for amateurs

With almost 20,000 finishers this year, the Marine Corps Marathon – held on Oct. 30, the week before New York’s – is the country’s fourth-largest 26.2-mile race. Unlike New York’s, it is a strictly amateur race; there is no prize money. Because of that, the event calls itself “The People’s Marathon.”

So what kind of people would cheat themselves?

At the center of the controversy is a Toronto-based group called JeansMarines, a nonprofit group that was founded by Dr. Jean Marmoreo and her husband, Bob Ramsay, after they completed their first Marine Corps Marathon in 2001. On its Web site, the organization describes itself as “a group of Canadian women who dare ourselves to do the impossible; to run the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. … no matter how fearful, reluctant or out of shape we were when we began. In the process … we change in ways we never thought possible.”

Cheating presumably was never part of the JeansMarines training program. Yet, that is exactly what the group admitted doing. Marine Corps Marathon race director Rick Nealis said eight members of JeansMarines – out of 200 from the group who participated in the race – were directed by Marmoreo to take a shortcut near the 10-mile mark and then to rejoin the race course at about mile 14. This would enable them to reach Washington’s 14th Street Bridge at mile 22 before the mandatory 51/2-hour cutoff time. (At that point, the bridge would open to vehicular traffic.) After taking the shortcut, the women supposedly continued on and completed the remaining 12 miles of the course. (Race organizers are also looking into allegations that another 22 members of JeansMarines also cut the course at a different location.)

‘We made a mistake’Nealis said he heard about the course-cutting from an eyewitness. He and his staff then analyzed the data from computerized chips marathon participants wear to keep track of their time and concluded that the eight women had, indeed, cut the course.

Meanwhile, when bloggers picked up the story and contacted her, Marmoreo called Nealis and admitted that she had encouraged her “Marines” to take the shortcut.

As a result, JeansMarines have been banned from participating in the 2006 Marine Corps Marathon. Marmoreo and her husband issued an apology on their Web site. “We made a mistake,” the statement read. “We’re sorry. And we’ve taken corrective action. … No shortcutting will be encouraged, allowed or tolerated.”

Marmoreo asked the eight women to return their finishers medals. “They feel they’ve accomplished a great deal in terms of fitness and weight loss,” said Ramsay. But “they certainly understand the reasons for [returning the medals].”

Others in the marathon world may not be as understanding. “The sport has gotten a bit of the black eye,” said New York City Marathon spokesman Richard Finn. “This raises the idea that [course-cutting] goes on more prevalently than it actually does.” Still, he says, “you shake your head and wonder why they did it.”

Decal says she can understand the urge to want to quit in the middle of a marathon, but not to cheat. “I was going to drop out at mile 16,” she said. “But I wouldn’t have walked back on the course further along in the race and then accepted a medal for doing less than the full distance. There’s no honor in that.”

To keep goals, set them wisely

To sports psychologist Dr. John Murray, the Marine Corps Marathon cheating incident, in which a group of eight back-of-the-pack participants admitted taking a 4-mile shortcut along the 26.2 mile course, illustrates an important point about goal-setting.

“Goals should be primarily based on performance and process and much less on outcome,” says Murray, who is based in West Palm Beach, Fla. “That helps put the sport where it should … as a healthy outlet for fitness.”

That’s worth remembering if you’re planning to set fitness and health-related “resolutions” for the New Year. A goal of “I will lose 25 pounds by mid-February” is not only unrealistic, it’s outcome-based.

A better and more achievable objective would be to go to the gym consistently or to make some specific dietary modifications and stick with them.

Here are some other goal-setting tips for fitness:

Set specific, short-term goals: “Looking and feeling better are good long-term goals,” says personal trainer and author Douglas Brooks.

A more tangible, short-term goal, he says, might be to exercise three times a week. “This is realistic and achievable and will serve to motivate you until you reach your loftier or more ambitious goals.”

Keep your workouts at reasonable lengths: There’s a tendency for people who are getting back into the gym to overdo it – to work out every night, for an hour or more. More often than not, that leads to injury and premature burnout.

Write down your goals and keep track of your progress: Studies have shown that people who keep a training diary are more likely to stick with a program.

Stay flexible, but stay with it: The Web site mygoals.com says that continual modification of our goals is now recognized as a key to reaching them. So don’t be afraid to adjust and amend your fitness goals. You don’t have to stick with the program, just make sure you stick with a program.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRESIDENT BUSH THIS WEEKEND

JohnFMurray.com – Dec 2, 2005 – News Update – Former president George Bush, 81, will play in Chris Evert’s charity event this weekend at the Delray Beach Tennis Center in South Florida. Bush, an avid tennis fan, is a longtime supporter of her tournament, which has raised more than $13 million to fight drug abuse and help neglected children. Others in the field include NBC Dateline anchor Stone Phillips, Grammy winner Michael W. Smith, actors Scott Foley, Alan Thicke and Jon Lovitz, and tennis players Lindsay Davenport, Tommy Haas, Mary Joe Fernandez, Justin Gimelstob, Vince Spadea and Luke and Murphy Jensen.

Dr. John F. Murray will attend the Friday night cocktail party at the Boca Raton Hotel and Club accompanied by a client.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

DR. MURRAY AND OTHER PERFORMANCE PANELISTS TO SPEAK AT MARATHON

JohnFMurray.com – Nov 30, 2005 – News Update – Sports Psychologist Dr. John F. Murray and other Performance Panelists from the Chamber of the Commerce of the Palm Beaches will be speaking this Saturday at 1:30 PM to entrants in the Marathon of the Palm Beaches. This will be held at the Hariett Gilman Theater in City Place, West Palm Beach.

Other panelists will include:

Patti Wilmoth, ACSM Fitness Institute, ACE, AFAA, ISCA Fitness Specialist

Cindy Collins, M.S., R.D., L.D./N., Licensed Nutritionist, Registered Dietician

Steve Sylvester, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, Orthopaedic Certified Specialist, Diplomate, American Board of Physical Therapy Specialist

Dr. Leslie Zebel, LMHC, Licensed Mental health Counselor

Dr. David Dyer, Director Oasis Therapy Center at Hippocrates Health Institute, Health Education and Restoration Specialist

Dr. Mark Ashley, Family Chiropractor

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

CONFIDENCE NOW AUCTIONED ON EBAY

JohnFMurray.com – Nov 30, 2005 – For Immediate Release – The Cowardly Lion received his medal for courage on the Wizard of Oz. Now, for the First Time Ever, Confidence is Auctioned on eBay. The age of mental skills training has fully arrived as eBay users can now bid on a one-hour mental coaching session aimed at teaching confidence, or any of 7 other critical mental skills important in success

Palm Beach, FL (PRWEB) November 27, 2005 — For the first time ever, a performance specialist in business, sports, academics, and healthcare is offering on Ebay a one hour mental coaching session by phone or in person aimed at teaching one of the 8 critical mental skills.

Bidding on Ebay starts at $10 and any amount above the normal fee for a one-hour session will be donated to charity. The item can be found on eBay here

Dr. John F. Murray, who authored the best-selling tennis book “Smart Tennis” (endorsed by world #1 Lindsay Davenport) and who works with busineses, healthcare personnel, NFL players, as well as professional golfers, tennis players, and other athletes, believes that it’s extremely important to get the message out about the benefits of training the brain.

“We’ve gone as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” stated Murray. “With the mind, limitations are always self-imposed,” added the doctor.

Bidding starts at $10 and the winner will receive one hour by phone or in person. It should be made clear that this hour is not for psychological counseling or psychotherapy, but rather for a mental teaching session focused on one of the following mental skills: confidence, focus, energy control, goal setting, imagery, enjoyment, resilience or discipline.

Many pro athletes, teams, businesses, and organizations receive the benefits of mental coaching, but the general population is still often surprised to know that these services even exist, as there are few legitimate performance psychologists or other professionals to provide these services. “It’s truly a cutting edge science and profession, says Murray, but the benefits have been demonstrated time and time again.”

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.