Posts Tagged ‘new york’

Friend Finder Puts People Back in Touch

Special Report – Palm Beach, Florida – Several years ago Dr. John F. Murray, clinical and sports psychologist in Palm Beach, Florida, began offering a free service using the power of the web to find lost acquaintances and friends. “It worked brilliantly” said Dr. Murray, and “I even used the service to locate a few old friends from childhood that I had not seen in over 35 years!” Whether you attended the same academy or school, or knew that person in the neighborhood in the 1950s, it really worked!

The success of the web to put people in touch off anyone’s site really (it is more effective if the site is popular and gets lots of hits like here at johnfmurray.com) is based on the relatively common phenomenon knowing as “ego surfing” in which internet users type their own name into a search box such as google or yahoo to see where they appear online. “Since I am contributing almost daily to the international, national and local media on topics related to sports psychology training and mental health, my name pops up all the time in articles and blogs that I was not even aware of,” claims Dr. Murray. Murray has been dubbed the “football freud” by the Washington Post and the “Roger Federer of sports psychology” by Tennis Week Magazine.

As a service to visitors to his site, Dr. Murray accepts emails from people all the time and then posts their names on his site to that others engaging in ego surfing will find their names on the site and contact Dr. Murray to be put back in touch with the lost friend. “I do it because it is fun and it is a way to get people to visit my site and see all the exciting things going on,” asserts Murray.

Here are the latest list of requests from people looking for long lost friends: (1) Michael Butler from Sacramento, California writes to say that he is seeking to re-connect with New York City native and schoolboy friend known as John Artusi. (2) Stephen Reynolds of Charlotte, NC is looking for an old girlfriend from high school in the suburbss of Chicago named Lisa Giordano. (3) Frank Morris of Gainesville, FL is looking for James Smith who used to live in Stoughton, MA many years ago. (4) Judy Lambert who lived in Boca Raton, FL many years ago is looking for her old neighborhood friend who she thinks moved to Plymouth, MA in the late 1960s but they went separate ways. (5) Monty Smith of Phoenix, AZ would like to re-connect with his teenage sweetheart who lived in Tuscon and her maiden name was Cynthia Murray (no relation to Dr. John Murray). (6) Attorney Stephen Miller lived over on the west coast of Florida many years ago (early 1970s) and lost contact with a golfing buddy, Frank Washington of Pinellas Park, FL and wonders whatever happened to him. (7) Ex North Palm Beach, FL resident William Smith (now living in Dallas) recalls dating a girl in high school from in Jupiter and Juno Beach, FL in the 1980s named Virginia Jones and they used to go boating frequently off Juno Beach.

I hope you use this service and sincerely believe that time travel to an interesting and distant past can promote a bright future when old connections are made! Just contact Dr. John F Murray by email and he will post your name and who you are searching for in the next update (johnfmurray@mindspring.com). Hope you enjoyed this benefit of the website dedicated to sports psychology.

NEW YORK CITY MARATHON

Palm Beach Post -Oct 21, 2008, 2004 – Hal Habib – Radcliffe wins closest women’s race. Four seconds help to cure Olympic heartache.

{Note: Dr. Murray appeared on BBC to talk about Paula Radcliffe along with Olympic speed skater Dan Jansen. You can hear the entire interview in the Audio & Video section of this website}

NEW YORK � They say the New York City Marathon can be a brutal race, spanning all five boroughs and countless hills and bridges over 26.2 miles.
Lies, all lies.

Britain’s Paula Radcliffe surges past Kenya’s Susan Chepkemei in Central Park during the final stretch of the New York City Marathon.
England’s Paula Radcliffe was crowned champion Sunday afternoon by winning a race that required 11 weeks and 5,393 miles of endurance.
Remember, Radcliffe was the one who failed to win the Olympic marathon in Greece. The one who failed to even finish either of her two races in Greece. The one who failed, period. “Radcliffe dream dies in gutter,” read one British headline, which wasn’t even the worst of it.
Here’s one headline that might work for this morning: Fleet feet beat Fleet Street.

Sunday, Radcliffe fought off the critics and Kenya’s Susan Chepkemei to capture the closest women’s race in the New York City Marathon’s 35-year history, winning by fourseconds in 2 hours, 23 minutes, 10 seconds.

“This wasn’t about redemption,” her husband, Gary, kept saying afterward, except the more he talked, the less he sounded like even he was buying it.

“When you go through something as traumatic as that,” he finally said, “I guess there’s going to be some mental thing, mental scars. It’s a trauma.”

Radcliffe herself admitted as much. By Mile 24, it was unclear what was causing her more distress, her Saturday night dinner of cold spaghetti Bolognese or Chepkemei turning up the heat with stride-for-stride pressure. Someone asked her whether she had any flashbacks to Athens. “Nothing like that horrible feeling,” she answered.
Who could have known that as the world-record holder and overwhelming favorite sat crying on that curb in Greece, the seeds for triumph were planted?

Watching the scene unfold on the video board at the old Olympic stadium were Mary Wittenburg, executive vice president of the New York Road Runners, and media relations director Richard Finn. Wittenburg, a former champion of the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, knew precisely how to help Radcliffe.

“We were standing at the top of the stadium and I said, ‘Paula should run New York,’ ” Wittenburg said. “I knew she could win it. After a major disappointment like that, we kind of stand back and take more of a supportive approach â€â€? we started working on 2005 â€â€? but personally, immediately I thought this is what she should do.”
She e-mailed Radcliffe: “Why don’t you come to the race this year as a spectator? You and Gary can spend a weekend in New York.”
Sure, the Radcliffes said. Then, on Oct. 18, Wittenburg received an e-mail: “I’m somewhat keen to thinking it might be good to run this year. What do you think?”

Wittenburg wanted to reply, “We’d be quite keen to have you,” but played it straight. “We would welcome you with open arms.”
By the time financial details were worked out and the announcements were made, only 12 days remained until the starting gun. It was hard to tell what was more shocking â€? that the world’s premier marathoner would commit to a race so late or that she’d even consider competing so soon after also dropping out of the Olympic 10,000 meters.

The British wondered if, at age 30, Radcliffe had much left, even though it was only last year that she smashed the world record with a 2:15:25. In the past several days, Liz McColgan, the last Brit to win New York, questioned why Radcliffe would enter, and the headlines included, “Why is Radcliffe risking it all?” Questions abounded on how much New York was paying her to appear and whether she just wanted to promote her upcoming book, The Story So Far.

“I don’t think it was about sending out messages,” Radcliffe said of the victory. “It was about running well and enjoying it and just being back to racing normally. And in its own right, winning New York is very special to me.”

It should be. The women upstaged the men in a race that lived up to its billing as having the best women’s field in New York’s history.
“Dreams can sometime come true and it came true today,” race director Allan Steinfeld said.

The field included the Netherlands’ Lornah Kiplagat, who had complained that Radcliffe’s late entry was “a bit selfish” and forced her to change her tactics. Kiplagat stayed among the lead pack until shortly before the 20-mile mark; she faded to seventh.
Radcliffe, meanwhile, looked like Radcliffe, which is to say her head bob made it appear she was suffering from the first step. She was a stride ahead of Chepkemei along Central Park South, but Chepkemei, her arms flailing, pulled even as they entered the final 400 yards toward the finish at Tavern on the Green. If Radcliffe was going to win, it would require one more surge. She had it in her.

“Paula was out here to prove herself as one of the best marathoners in the world and she did that,” said American Deena Kastor, the bronze medalist from Athens who failed to finish Sunday because of leg cramps. “She had a rough race but that’s the nature of this sport â€? when it’s bad, it’s really ugly and when it’s good, we can come out with shiny medals and strong performances.”

True, but there’s one medal Radcliffe still doesn’t own.

“I don’t think you can really quantify today and relate it to Athens,” Gary Radcliffe said. “I mean, Athens was Athens and this is a unique event. Obviously she’s very happy and she can move on. This wasn’t about redemption. It wasn’t about saying ‘look at me’ or whatever. This is about her turning the page and moving forward.”
And if that page has a rosy headline today, all the better.