Posts Tagged ‘sports psychology’

Dimension IX: Inspiration to Become a Sports Psychologist

When I wrote “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History” I wanted to make it much more than a “self-help” or “how to” book for football coaches and teams. It can serve that purpose, but it is far more than that too, and the first 100 pages or so are very much like an auto-biography in which I tell my own story.

I write about my upbringing in South Florida in the 60s and 70s, and about my exposure to greatness as a fan through the excitement of the Miami Dolphins Perfect Season in 1972 and then later as a coach and sports psychologist. Good things just kept happening all around me and I became extremely interested in learning more about what makes a team a champion.

As a tennis coach traveling all around the world from Hawaii to Florida, Germany to the Middle East, Austria to Texas, I became fascinated by how critically important the mental game was in sports, yet how few resources existed to help others in this area. It was not surprising that the book Inner Game of Tennis was a worldwide hit in 1974 … we were starving internally and have only in recent years begun to really adopt an inner approach to training and preparation for high level competition.

You will enjoy the many anecdotes in this book “The Mental Performance Index,” such as the time I coached the current King of Saudi Arabia tennis lessons in Riyadh, relied on the advice of a legless and dying man to help an NFL quarterback bounce back from his struggles, and studied the loneliness of Mad King Ludwig of Bavaria during a trip to Neuschwanstein Castle to crystalize my understanding of some NFL coaches and leaders in major corporations.

I hope you enjoyed this little trip down the avenue of sports psychology.

Dimension VIII: Why Bill Walsh was so Great as 49ers Head Coach

When I wrote “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History,” I knew that Bill Walsh and the San Francisco 49ers were good, but I did not know how good until I crunched all the data and ranked the teams from 1-90. It would turn out that the 49ers teams own 3 of the top 6 spots of all time in terms of performance on Super Sunday. Much of this was the doing of the late great coach Bill Walsh.

I met and befriended Lesley Visser as I was getting ready to go over to Beijing for the 2008 Summer Olympic games. We shared a common interest in tennis and football, and she was very excited about my upcoming book and offered to write the epilogue. She wanted to write it about Bill Walsh, whom she had known from her many NFL broadcasts, and I was thrilled. She did a terrific job and you can now read about what made this man so enormously successful as a coach.

For example, you will read that while Walsh projected an image as the intellectual professor, and did not like to yell at his players, he was anything but soft. In fact, he was an amateur boxer and he liked to study the intricate moves of Mohammed Ali, and he used the principles he learned from boxing (like coaching his team’s offensive and defensive lines to always explode off the ball faster than the opponent) to make his team better.

Lesley Visser is the only female in the pro football Hall of Fame, and she has a resume as a broadcaster that is too long for this page. I know you will love her epilogue and learn more about the genius and ferocity of Walsh when you read “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History.”

I hope you enjoyed learning more about this book focused on sports psychology.

Dimension VII: Daily Lessons Learned from Super Bowls

I am the author of ““The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History”“and you might be surprised to learn that this book is not only about football and sports psychology.

When I wrote this book, I wanted to do something similar to what I did in my first book “Smart Tennis: How to Play and Win the Mental Game,” and that is to give the reader something to take home and use to better their life.

The NFL Super Bowl is perhaps the most competitive game played every year and it is played on the biggest stage of all with billions of viewers from all over the world. Talk about pressure! I figured that if I could dissect what the keys to success in each one of these games were, I would then be able to provide people all over the world my findings so that they could improve their lives by reading the book and learning from the success principle that was taught on the natural stage of Super Bowl Sunday.

In this new book you will see these 45 lessons for success appear in the text and then again all together in a useful list for the reader at the end of the book. Learn from the biggest competitive arenas the world has known and apply these 45 lessons to your own self improvement.

I hope you enjoyed this little glimpse into the world of sports psychology.

Dimension VI: The Best Super Bowl Teams Ever

I am the author of ““The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History”” which, like the title implies, uses a systematic approach to determine which teams were best.

It was only after standardizing performance ratings in a football game with the Mental Performance Index statistic (MPI for short) that we were able to compare how teams had performed even when they were over 40 years apart. Using a play rating system that is fair and balanced, the MPI total score indicates how closely a given team came to perfection in a game in a similar manner that a baseball batting average shows how close a batter came to perfection on a scale of .000 to 1.000. In the case of football team performance, however, .500 is roughly average performance.

There were a total of 14 MPI statistics created and 14 more traditional statistics were analyzed in the book, so we looked at a total of 28 ways of determining how good a team was, and team rankings for all 28 statistics are presented in this book. Of course everyone wants to know which team was best overall, and that is shown in the MPI Total score (MPI-T) rankings in which the top 32 performing teams on Super Bowl Sunday are listed.

Read this book and let the debates begin over which team was best!

I hope you enjoyed this brief glimpse into the world of sports psychology.

The “Tough Guys Talk” Initiative

Sports Psychology Excerpts – from pages 54-55 of the book “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History” by John F Murray (World Audience, 2011):

Stephan and I had often discussed the misconception about talking to a psychologist or counselor that seemed to exist in our society, and especially in some of the more powerful quarters. It needed to change. The supposedly tough types that we often saw in business and pro sports, like the CEOs, NBA stars, or head NFL coaches had somehow learned to associate “toughness” with grueling schedules, physical pain tolerance and the hesitancy to open up about problems or seek counseling. But once they did open up it was clear that this repression had exacted a toll and they were filled with more needs than most. Examined closer, it just jumps out at you that what is really going on when an athletic or business culture fails to encourage help seeking, or when anyone avoids dealing with a serious issue, it is anything but “tough” and more accurately quite “weak!” Not meeting issues head on is actually rooted in deep fear and insecurity.

One example that was recently brought to my attention was when NFL hall of fame quarterback Warren Moon wrote a book in which he admitted that he was seeing a therapist for many years and sneaking in the back door of his therapist’s office at night so that nobody would notice he was seeking help. Pro football hall of famer, Lesley Visser, who writes a beautiful epilogue in this book, called to tell me the news of Warren Moon’s admission. I thanked her and told her that I would make sure to convey the message in this book that the toughest among us are those who when faced with problems and are not afraid to seek help, and I called it “tough guys talk.” Warren Moon should be proud that he faced his issues, but societal pressure made it harder for him to share the benefits he was receiving with others until now.

I have a solution, and it starts with every top executive in major sports as a campaign to encourage star athletes to face problems head-on and talk with a counselor or sport psychologist when needed. Every senior executive and coach or manager in the NFL, MLB, NBA and NHL should institute a program and call it: “Tough Guys Talk” with a poster and just these words on top in bright bold lettering. It should be posted in every locker room listing some of the great players who won national championships while talking with a sports psychologist or counselor. The list would be most impressive because some great athletes do seek help but then don’t talk about it because of the stigma that they will appear weak. Hogwash! These leaders would in one fell swoop begin to eradicate idiocy and allow more players to access care and be tough by talking rather than running like little children in fear of being ostracized.

The program I propose would start with just one team’s GM. And since I am related to one of the greatest ever and feel that he can have an enormous impact like none other, I personally and cheerfully challenge Cousin Bill Polian to institute a “Tough Guys Talk” program with the Colts. When Mr. Polian or another top executive in sports does this he will establish himself even more as a visionary who cared enough for his people to allow them to develop and improve.

I hope you enjoyed this excerpt from Sports Psychology.

Brandon Marshall Admits he has Personality Disorder

Sports Psychology Update – John F Murray – Great Job Brandon Marshall of the Miami Dolphins! More people need to see mental illness for what it is. It is real, and it is more difficult than a broken leg.

Here is the story in ESPN

Hope you enjoyed that little message form the world of sports psychology.

Dimension IV: A New Finding in Sports Science and Football

I am the author of ““The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History”” which discusses a shocking realization and an important scientific discovery in team sports. It is something that should over the years (as this book becomes more and more distributed and understood) really support sports psychology and the mission of sports psychologists, and help coaches and teams win much more too if they adopt the learning! Can you tell that I am excited?

While “The Mental Performance Index” is the title of a book, it is also the name of a new statistic that I invented for football. Before this book, football team mental performance, and in fact all team mental performance, was simply never measured professionally, accurately or at all. By measuring this in all 45 Super Bowls played from 1967 to 2011, I made the incredible discovery that this measure of performance (which includes mental performance in a total measure of performance) is what separates winning teams from losing teams. The factor appears to be even more important than points scored or given up.

The shocking realization is that we had overlooked something so critical to success forever, but when we looked at it professionally it correlated with winning more than any other statistic! It was better than all the other traditional stats for football team performance. That is what I mean by a scientific discovery in team sports. After this book finally gets around, the world should never really be exactly the same in sports or sports psychology.

Dimension III: 4-Time Super Bowl Winning Tom Flores’ Take on the MPI

I am the author of ““The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History”” which is supported by 4-Time Super Bowl winning coach and player Tom Flores, who wrote the forward to the book. He has an interesting view about the MPI and sports psychology and I wanted you to know it.

I chose Tom Flores for my forward (and was thrilled when he accepted) because I wanted to find the most successful people in Super Bowl history to get behind the book and concepts. Tom Flores fit the bill well. Flores has a perfect 4-0 record in Super Bowls, making him unquestionably one of a handful of the most successful persons in NFL history. He is the only one to win a Super Bowl as a player, assistant coach, and two times as a head coach with the Oakland & Los Angeles Raiders.

Flores has been around football for over 50 years, so it should be very interesting to hear his views. In my book “The Mental Performance Index,” Flores writes the following in his forward: “Dr. Murray has developed a system that is part of the evolution of football: The ability to identify, quantify and utilize a grading system that will aid coaches and players. It is a method of identifying the strengths and weaknesses of every aspect of a team and or individual. It is a system that can point out the direction needed for improvement. Sports have come a long way in the past century. The future, compared to the past, is vast. Innovation was frowned upon for years but not any longer. Teams, coaches and players are always looking for an edge and a way to stay ahead of the field. Dr. Murray’s Mental Performance Index can be and will be the next part of sports evolution in the 21st Century.”

For more information about this book and what Tom Flores has to say, please scroll back up and click on the link to the book. And by the way, if Tom Flores is not in the Hall of Fame soon, there is something terribly wrong with that picture. Enjoy the book!

I hope you enjoyed this glimpse into the world of sports psychology.

Dimension II: The Role of the Sports Psychologist on a Team

I am the author of “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History” which addresses the role of the sports psychologist in football. It occasionally occurs that there are fears that some coaches have about mental coaching and sports psychology.

While I cannot speak for other sports psychologists, I always start with the assumption that the coach is the captain of the ship and I am there to provide a needed service just the same way any professional would, all the way from the team physician to the dentist, trainer, assistant coach, and massage therapist. I am not and have no desire to be the head coach. He brings me in to help with his own philosophy of football. I am there to adapt to his needs to help him and help the team achieve worthy goals.

If you would like to read more about this coach/sports psychologist relationship and how to ensure that everything goes smoothly to best help the team, how coaches are respected as the boss, how problems are prevented before they occur, and much more, you will want to read “The Mental Performance Index.”

Book Dimension I: Training a Football Team Mentally

Is winning important to you? If so, read on, as I recently wrote a book to help teams win called “The Mental Performance Index: Ranking the Best Teams in Super Bowl History.”

Anyone seriously interested in football wants to win. This applies to the head coach of an NFL team just as much as it does to the high school player trying to make his varsity team for the first time and to fans in every major city. It applies also to what I do, and it is the main reason why I developed the Mental Performance Index statistic. I want to help teams win.

If football and other sports did not have this innate competitiveness, I would find a more worthwhile way to spend my time. Human beings reach their highest states when striving for great achievements. I honestly developed the MPI so that I could one day stand on the sidelines with an NFL team as the head coach was receiving the Lombardi Trophy and know that my contribution played some small role in that team’s achievement.

My fascination with the ultimate accomplishment applies to other sports too. I’d also love to someday do my part to help teams win Stanley Cups, World Series titles, NBA championships and why stop there? But football holds a special place in my heart and mind, so I developed the MPI for football first. There will be future extensions of the MPI to other sports, but let’s do football first.

To learn more about how to help your team win with the MPI and sports psychology, how to view the relationship between the sports psychologist and head coach, how the knowledge of the MPI gives a football coaching staff more power and increases player confidence, and how to use the MPI to set and achieve better goals for the team, you will want to read my new book “The Mental Performance Index.”