Posts Tagged ‘vince spadea’

The Power of Goal Setting with Spadea

Sports Psychology Tip #2 – John F. Murray, Ph.D. – Setting goals is incredibly important in any achievement situation. I use goal setting with all my clients, but the goals and strategies differ markedly depending on the athlete, the sport and the circumstance. Still you need to be away of some principles. I refer you to an article on goal setting that I wrote as a two page centerfold for Tennis Magazine in 2007.

Below is a video of my client, Vince Spadea, talking about how goals have helped him in his career:

Dr. John and Vince Spadea on Social Facilitation

Sports Psychology Tip #1 – John F. Murray, Ph.D. – If you are a serious athlete it is extremely important to get the crowd behind you. The benefit from an audience is called the “audience effect” or “social facilitation.” It works best with advanced performers in many fields. The opposite effect, social obstruction, can reduce performance with a large crowd when the skills are not well refined. See the article on social obstruction with mention of social facilitation here

In the video below, Dr. John F. Murray and his client Vince Spadea, whom he was coaching in Chicago in 2009, talk about how Vince has benefited from a supportive crowd in Key Biscayne and Delray Beach in his career. He is from South Florida, so he talks about how well he has done in these tournaments and attributes it to sports psychology and social facilitation.

Sports Psychology Workshop Videos and Spadea

Wimbledon, England – Special to JohnFMurray.com – It was a long time since Vince Spadea had won at Wimbledon, not to mention that he had not won anywhere in a while. “It was good to see the scrappy veteran prove that when the going gets tough, the rapper gets going in a decisive 3 set victory over Paul Capdeville 6-0, 6-4, 7-5,” said sports psychologist Dr. John F. Murray. “It was especially rewarding for me that his success came right on the heels of the 2009 Smart Tennis Sports Psychology Workshops held two days prior, and not too far from the All England Lawn Tennis Club.” Videos of this workshop in several parts are now available on YouTube.

“The British tennis fan and serious amateur competitive tennis player love Vince Spadea,” said Murray. “They tell me that they enjoy his personality and outspoken nature the way they loved John McEnroe, even if their reviews of his musical abilities are mixed.” “He’s eccentric, and the British people are too conservative, so he helps keep us balanced,” said one tennis player who recently attended Murray’s sports psychology workshop.

Murray has been working with and supporting Spadea since his record losing streak and subsequent comeback, and officially coached Spadea to a win over his next Wimbledon opponent, Igor Andreev, at the 2007 Australian Open. “I’ve not traveled with him this year as a fill-in coach. I stick to sports psychology most of the time from my office and usually meet with him when he is in town. Australia was a fun trip in ’07 and I got several coaching wins with him on the Aussie Open tour, but it’s almost unheard of for a sports psychologist to assume the coaching role, even if temporarily, but I had been a tennis coach in the past. What works best for most players, and is really lacking, is solid training in sports psychology”.”

SPADEA’S GUARANTEE IN TENNIS CELEBS

Tennis Celebs – Sept 23, 2005 – Pro Tennis Player Vince Spadea Guarantees Top 10 Ranking with Help from Sport Psychologist – Vince Spadea promises that the best is still to come. This is a promise from a player best known for his determination as a tenacious scrambler on the court. To prove his new commitment, Vince recently began working again with his sport performance psychologist. He now guarantees that mental coaching will help him achieve his highest career ranking ever, top 10 in the world.

Spadea, rarely a stranger to adversity, recovered from the longest losing streak ever (21 straight) before winning his first ATP Tour title in Scottsdale last year. He beat James Blake and Andy Roddick en route to victory. In his comeback, Spadea rose from 229 to a career-best 18 in the world.

Injuries and adversity returned this year as Spadea dropped to 49 this week even after reaching the finals in Newport, RI a couple months ago.

“Rather than get discouraged or depressed, it’s a gift that I’m as high as 50 compared to where I was when I began the previous comeback,” Spadea declared.

“My rise will again be accomplished with help from my sport performance psychologist, John F. Murray, who formerly helped me back from my longest losing streak.”

Spadea got the idea of daring to make a public guarantee after thinking about great accomplishments and history. “Joe Namath guaranteed a Super Bowl victory when no-one believed in him; the 1980 USA Hockey Team truly believed; nobody thought David would slay Goliath. Even my performance psychologist stuck his neck on the line and lost 64 pounds after he made a public guarantee.”

Spadea claims that his public guarantee will help strengthen his resolve and commitment. “Comebacks are never easy, but they are a part of sports, and I’m quite ready and excited about this new challenge. I will achieve Top 10 in the world. I guarantee it!”

Spadea was known as the “giant-killer” a few years back after compiling the best record in the world against top-10 ranked players. He has beaten many legends of the game including Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi. His backhand is regarded as one of the best in the game.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

SPADEA ISSUES TOP 10 GUARANTEE

Tennis Week – Sep 20, 2005 – Vince Spadea has a message for Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Marat Safin and other members of the top 10 â€? make room for me. The 49th-ranked Spadea has guaranteed he will attain his highest career ranking ever ” top 10 in the world. Click for Photo of Vince Spadea and John Murray as Vince Makes the Guarantee in Boca Raton September 15

The 31-year-old Spadea, who has registered a 19-21 record on the season, recently began working again with his sport performance psychologist. He now guarantees that mental coaching will help him achieve his highest career ranking ever, top 10 in the world.

“Comebacks are never easy, but they are a part of sports, and Im quite ready and excited about this new challenge,” said Spadea, who owns career wins over Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras. “I will return to my highest ranking ever. I guarantee it!”

Spadea, rarely a stranger to adversity, recovered from the longest losing streak in ATP Tour history, suffering 21 straight losses before resurrecting his career. Spadea claimed his first ATP Tour title in Scottsdale last year. He beat James Blake and Andy Roddick en route to victory. In his comeback, Spadea rose from No. 229 to a career-best No. 18 in the world.

Injuries and adversity returned this year as Spadea dropped to 49 this week even after reaching the final in Newport in July.

“Rather than get discouraged or depressed, its a gift that Im as high as 50 compared to where I was when I began the previous comeback,” Spadea declared. “My rise will again be accomplished with help from my sport performance psychologist, John F. Murray, who formerly helped me back from my longest losing streak.”

Spadea got the idea of daring to make a public guarantee after thinking about great accomplishments and history.

“Joe Namath guaranteed a Super Bowl victory when no-one believed in him; the 1980 USA Hockey Team truly believed; nobody thought David would slay Goliath,” Spadea said. “Even my performance psychologist stuck his neck on the line and lost 64 pounds after he made a public guarantee.”

Spadea claims that his public guarantee will help strengthen his resolve and commitment.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

SPADEA’S RENEWED DESIRE AND FOCUS

Orlando Sentinel – Sep 18, 2005 – Short Takes – We received this “breaking-news” e-mail this week, headlined: “Vince Spadea Makes a Public Guarantee to Achieve a Top 10 Ranking with Renewed Desire and Focus.” Our first thought was, “Vince Spadea is still playing tennis?” Our second thought was, “OK, how’s he going to get back into the top 10?” According to the e-mail, “To prove his new commitment, Vince recently began working again with his sport-performance psychologist [John F. Murray]. He now guarantees that mental coaching will help him achieve his highest career ranking ever, top 10 in the world.” According to the e-mail, Spadea is 49th in the world rankings.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

VINCE SPADEA IN FINALS TODAY

Campbell’s Hall of Fame Tennis Championships – Newport, Rhode Island – Jul 10, 2005 – Vince Spadea defeated Paul Goldstein 7-6(6), 6-2 in the semifinals and advances to today’s finals vs Greg Rusedski, the 2004 champion

Two 30-year-olds will meet in an ATP final for the first time since 2003 when 30-year-old Vince Spadea plays 31-year-old Greg Rusedski in the title match of the Campbell’s Hall of Fame Championships in Newport. The last all-30-year-old final on the circuit was in San Jose
in 2003 when 32-year-old Andre Agassi defeated 30-year-old Davide Sanguinetti.

Spadea reached his first final of 2005 and the fifth of his career with a 7-6 (6), 6-2 win over Paul Goldstein. Serve was held just six times in the 20 games between the second seeded Spadea and seventh seeded Goldstein. Spadea went up a hold, breaking Goldstein twice in the first three games of the match to go up 3-0.

The players exchanged breaks, allowing Spadea to hold a 3-1 lead. A pair of breaks and a hold from Goldstein allowed him to rally and level the match at 4-all. Another exchanges of breaks, and then a pair of holds pushed the set to a tie-break. Spadea jumped out to a 5-2 lead in the breaker, but once again Goldstein rallied, tying things up at 5-all. Spadea would prevail to claim the opening set.

Holding serve in the first and fifth games of the second set and breaking Goldstein three times allowed Spadea to go up 5-1 lead. The players xchanged breaks to end the set. Both players double faulted four times, and Spadea hit the lone ace of the match. Spadea won just 48 percent of his points on serve, compared to 38 percent for Goldstein. Spadea converted all eight of his break chances, while Goldstein got six breaks in nine attempts.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

SPADEA HIP-HOPS HIS WAY TO THE CLAY

Palm Beach Post – May 24, 2005 – Charles Elmore – PARIS â€? Here, truly, is a clash of the old world and the new. Albert Costa won the 2002 French Open. He grew up on clay courts in Spain. He likes to play cards, and supports soccer teams in Lerida and Barcelona. His favorite movie is Ben-Hur.

In his path today stands Vince Spadea, ranked No. 41, who came of age on the hard courts of Boca Raton. Along the way, Vince acquired the occasional urge to bust a rhyme.

Spadea offered this Roland Garros rap by e-mail in response to a request from The Palm Beach Post:

“Ladies and gents will be jumping the fence to catch a glimpse of Vince at the French, he’s so intense, doesn’t give you an inch!

I went from sitting on the bench with a dollar and fifty cents, to a corporate account at Merrill Lynch,

But let me know what yous think, when you see them dragging me off the links, at Roland Garros,

‘Cause Spadea will break you down, like a broken arrow, a golden pharaoh, fighting to be the hero at Roland Garros,

I’m tennis’s Robert DeNiro, and I’m representing South Florida, champagne pouring out, that don’t rhyme?

Shore it does, trying to keep up with the Joneses like Norah does… “

Sure, Costa knows how to slide on clay.

But can he hip-hop?

Spadea has advanced as far as the third round in Paris three times.

He offered this breakdown of today’s first-round matchup with Costa: “He’s a clay-court specialist who has been on tour for as many years as I have. No doubt there are better draws out there, but at the same time, he has dropped his ranking and performance a great deal from his win at Roland Garros, has showed signs of apathy, injury and inconsistent results on all surfaces, including clay. I see this as a good opportunity for me to see how well I can play against a well-established clay-courter. I know I’ve made improvements in the past year, and I welcome this challenge.”

Costa has won two of three times they met, but interestingly, Spadea won the last one, in the same year Costa won the French Open, 2002. Spadea triumphed on hard courts during the round of 64 at Tennis Masters Canada 6-3, 6-1.

Shoulder tendinitis kept Spadea out of action recently for about three weeks. He has packed plenty of Fig Newtons and Balance bars to keep his energy up.

“My biggest challenge going into clay-court events, especially Roland Garros, will be the grueling physical and mental demand it places on me,” Spadea said. “There are no free or easy points on clay. The three out of five sets at Roland Garros forces your fitness level to be at the highest standard. It’s just a war of attrition on clay. Difficult to win pretty. A strategy adjustment I need to make is to hit my strokes with more topspin for consistency and play percentage tennis, and use angles and drop shots to win extra points.”

A new Web site, vincespadea.com, features photos and updates on all matters Spadea. Among the links is one to sports performance psychologist John F. Murray of West Palm Beach, who has worked with Spadea.

This is the sort of advice Murray says he gives athletes looking to regain confidence after an injury: “Adapt your style to the injury. Set difficult, yet realistic, goals on how you want to play the upcoming match based on the possible effects of the injury. For example, if your shoulder is hurt and you cannot serve hard, you might plan to play a gritty match with many long points and win the battle of attrition. If the injury affects your forehand but your serve is fine, you might plan a more aggressive serve and volley game where you end points sooner. “

Another way of putting that might be: break you down, like a broken arrow, a golden pharaoh, fighting to be the hero at Roland Garros.

Costa is ranked No. 72 but holding every former champion’s suspicion that he has one more title in him.

By this time tomorrow, one of these two men, representatives from the old world and the new, will be tapped out or rapped out in Paris.

“Peace out, I gotta start jump roping, before I leave Paris without the crown at the French Open… â€?spadea”

Because at the end, only one man can be Le Shizzle.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

TENNIS-X NEWS, NOTES, QUOTES AND BARBS

Tennis-X.com – Feb 5, 2006 – Vince Spadea’s sport psychologist, Dr. John F. Murray, on his student in Delray Beach: “Vince is striking the ball down here cleaner and earlier than I have ever seen before. It is amazing. This is the result of many months of increased work ethic and seriousness, and in part due to the determination that comes from wanting to make good on a contract he signed with me last year to guarantee to reach Top 10 with sport psychology.

This exemplifies the power of goal setting and commitment — basic tools in psychology 101. I am confident that Vince will indeed make Top 10 if he stays injury free and doesn’t waver in his focus. He might even make Top 5 playing this well.”…

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.