Archive for the ‘News & Events’ Category

TOP RANKED BOWLER DELUTZ JR LAUNCHES WEBSITE

Dec 22, 2005 – One of Dr. Murray’s favorite clients, New York pro bowler Tommy Delutz Jr., notifies us today that he has launched his official website. It is of the highest technical sophistication and offers sections on the pro tour, his hobby of comedy, photos of friends including world class comedians and pro baseball players, a calander of his events, a message board and links.

The striking design of his site (pun intended) shows Tommy knocking down all the pins in real time and ideal form. The sport of bowling needs more colorful characters like Tommy, and he’s working vigoroulsy to achieve the higest level possible in his comeback from major wrist surgery. See him in the not so distant future on ESPN. Go Tommy, and thanks for publicly supporting the importance of the mental game in your great sport!

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

TENNIS WEEK ON VINCE SPADEA’S NEW BOOK

Tennis Week – Dec 21, 2005 – Richard Pagliaro – He may be the only man in tennis to party with John McEnroe, double date with Andy Roddick, question James Blake’s sportsmanship, spend a wild weekend in Vegas with Andre Agassi and bounce back from a record 21-match losing streak to produce the best tennis of his life. Vince Spadea has endured more highs and lows than a limbo contest between Ivo Karlovic and Mini Me.

He has played with and against the top players of the past decade â€â€? both on and off the court â€â€? and now the 31-year-old Spadea is your tour guide on a behind-the-scenes trip detailing life on the ATP Tour that he calls “a roller coaster ride.”

The veteran Spadea has collaborated with Tennis Week contributing writer and noted New York teaching pro Dan Markowitz (Tennis Week.com message board readers know him by the pseudonym Redhead) to write a behind-the-scenes look at life on the ATP Tour. Titled “Break Point: The Secret Diary Of A Pro Tennis Player”, the book will be released in either the spring or early summer of 2006. It’s a glimpse of life outside the lines featuring the competitors, coaches, characters and committed groupies populating the tennis landscape.

“My own intention, was to tell the truth and be brutally honest and show who I am,” Spadea says. “It’s a hard, tough life being a professional tennis player. I’ve met a lot of great players and great people. I’m telling you these stories through my eyes as a real guy who has lived this. You just don’t know how it will be received. Hopefully, it’s going to be a great thing for tennis and kind of transcend the tennis world and not just be what it’s like to be a tennis player, but show the story of an interesting character who can tell a story truthfully, win tennis matches, lose tennis matches and bleed just the way you bleed.”

The strong-willed Spadea has spent his career saying, rapping and achieving the unthinkable. Rebounding from a record 21-match losing streak that saw his 2000 year-end ranking plummet to No. 229, Spadea made a strong comeback. In 2004, Spadea claimed his first ATP title in his 223rd career tournament in Scottsdale, posted a personal best 40-win season and concluded the season ranked a year-end best No. 19.

Currently ranked No. 76, Spadea is now working with former Wimbledon winner and Beverly Hills Hotel teaching pro Alex Olmedo in training for the 2006 season.

Spadea and Markowitz, who have known each other for years, came up with the concept of collaborating on a diary-style, behind-the-scenes book shortly after discussing the idea of writing a book during the 2004 U.S. Open. The book chronicles Spadea’s experiences living life on the ATP Tour and provides readers with an all-access pass to the court, the locker room, practice sessions and player parties.

“It does something never done by any tennis book that I’ve ever read: It depicts the modern professional player dealing with all the aspects of life on the circuit: winning and losing, training, hiring and firing coaches, traveling around the world, women, tennis parents, locker room humor, umpires, and steroids,” Markowitz says. “But more than anything else, it deals with the personalities in the game as seen through Spadea’s eyes, a somewhat recluse on the tour, who closely evaluates the games and psyches of his fellow players. In 13 years on the tour, he’s played them all and intimately knows his competitor’s strengths and weaknesses.”

Some of the most intriguing anecdotal incidents the book details, according to its authors, include:

James Blake â€â€? Spadea, who has won seven of 10 meetings with Blake, recalls one clash with his rival in which Blake took time during a changeover to accuse Spadea of resorting to gamesmanship in trying to break his momentum by taking a bathroom break. Spadea, who has scored five straight wins over the Yonkers, N.Y. native, blasts Blake as a “bad sport” after the match. In another Blake-related anecdote that intensified the tension between the two, Spadea details the former Harvard all American stealing away a model Spadea brought to a players’ party while Spadea visited the bathroom.

Andy Roddick â€â€? Spadea explains why he believes Roddick’s game has declined a bit since the former No. 1 split with Brad Gilbert. Spadea also recounts the time he and Roddick squired two models to late-night clubs in Australia and how the models responded when Roddick offered to fly them back to South Florida.

Andre Agassi � Spadea details how it feels to step on the court against the eight-time Grand Slam champion and recalls the wild weekend he spent with Agassi in Vegas when he was just an 18-year-old practice partner and Agassi was training for his comeback.

John McEnroe â€â€? Spadea takes readers inside a memorable practice session with the Hall of Famer on the red clay of New York City’s Tennisport and, in another humorous anecdote, remembers attending a Los Angeles party along with McEnroe, Jim Carrey, Adam Sandler and Pamela Anderson, in which McEnroe introduced Spadea to fellow party goers by simply saying: “This is the guy who tanked at Wimbledon.” McEnroe selected Spadea to play against Spain in the Davis Cup semifinals in Santander, Spain in what proved to be McEnroe’s final tie as U.S. Davis Cup captain before younger brother Patrick succeeded him. Spadea’s public debate with Patrick McEnroe over the captain initially by-passing him for a spot on the squad that played Spain in the 2004 Davis Cup final is also explored in the book.

Pete Sampras â€â€? Spadea, who trained with Sampras’ former coach Pete Fischer and beat Sampras in their last meeting, details the qualities that make Sampras one of the greatest player in the history of the game as well as how Sampras enjoyed telling risque jokes.

Rafael Nadal â€â€? Spadea, who has split two career matches with the reigning Roland Garros champion, says he will be surprised if Nadal matches Jim Courier’s feat of winning four Grand Slam titles.

Brad Gilbert â€â€? The book illustrates why Gilbert was one of the most acerbic players in the game, but became one of tennis’ top coaches.
Women â€â€? Who are the biggest womanizers on the ATP Tour? Who are the Tour’s the biggest dogs? And what are the drawbacks to engaging female groupies? Spadea offers answers.

“I give you my honest opinions. It’s always interesting to be out there and wonder and now this book makes you wonder less and makes you feel like you’ve been on the tour for years,” Spadea says. “In a sense, it’s like a handbook of what it’s like to be a pro tennis player.

It makes you laugh and makes you sit and think and sometimes maybe even makes you sad. That’s a great mix, that’s what life on tour is about and that was my goal to give readers. So make sure you get eight hours of sleep before you read it because it is exciting. I guarantee you’ll laugh out loud, you’ll think a bit and you will definitely come away with some stories you will always remember.”

Spadea took time out from a recent practice session in Los Angeles to sit down with Tennis Week and talk about his book in this interview.

Tennis Week: Vince, how did this book originate?

Vince Spadea: I started in October of 2004. Basically, Dan and I have known each other from the past and from seeing each other at tournaments. We had an interview during the 2004 U.S. Open and Dan told me: “I think you have a good story. You’re an interesting character, you’ve had a great comeback with big wins and crazy losses and you do the rapping and writing. Let’s see if we can do a book?” If somebody just walks up to you and says “Hey, you want to write book?” How many people are going to say no? I was excited to do it and I feel we have a good story to tell people about what it’s like being a tennis player.

Tennis Week: What do you think distinguishes this book and what elements will appeal to tennis fans?

Vince Spadea: I think it’s a novel book because it’s a guy who is still in the middle of the mix talking very openly about life on the tour and that’s something that’s never really been done in the sport of tennis before.

Tennis Week: What was the concept going into the project?

Vince Spadea: The idea was to establish who I am and what it’s like to live the life of a tennis pro. By background, we establish who I am and what’s happened so far in my life and career. We used diary form because I’d already done online diaries for newspapers and web sites before. So I had explored that niche, it seemed to work for me and I had gotten some good feedback from some of my past articles. Dan is an experienced writer who is very good at picking out the most interesting stuff I’ve written. Basically, you’re walking through life on the tour with Vince Spadea when you read this book. It starts with the reader getting on the roller coaster ride that is the tour with me, you’re sitting right next to me, we put down the safety bar and then the ride starts.

Tennis Week: In writing the book, did you learn anything about yourself or about professional tennis that surprised you?

Vince Spadea: Writing the book helped me think through a lot of things and sort of reflect on what I’m trying to accomplish in my life and career, on what I see, what I’m feeling and what my opinions really are. It’s the world of tennis seen through Vince Spadea’s eyes. Writing is always sort of a reflective hobby and basically an action that can tell you some things about yourself because you write what has been going through your head whether that is good, bad or indifferent. Honesty is the most important thing when it comes to writing a diary and I was very honest in my writing. Pretty much, I was writing masses and masses of email to him. I would just think about something to write about and I wrote it on a PDA and sometimes on a lap top. Writing on a PDA helped me because anytime a thought or idea popped in my head I could immediately start writing it. Sometimes, the hardest thing about writing is starting to write: you get sort of cramped up and it’s hard to get the ball rolling. But once you actually start writing, I found I could really get going and write about everything from the profound factors of life as a tennis player to just simple commentary about the game or players.

Tennis Week: Are there any revelations or anecdotes in the book that may surprise tennis fans or fellow players?

Vince Spadea: I think I have used a lot of metaphors that really bring tennis to life â€â€? both my own life and other people’s lives. Whether it is an anecdote about a tennis match, or an off-court situation or a confrontation with another individual or player or a kinship that develops through tennis. Some parts of the book are about the every day lifestyle of a professional tennis player, some are comments about players, situations and tournaments and there’s also just locker-room banter and comical anecdotes. When you put it all together, it kind of takes the reader on this ride through the tour and it all flows. I’ve really put my heart and effort and soul into the writing of this book and thinking it through. I think if I wasn’t playing tennis I could have taken it to the further level as I had to try to multi-task in doing a lot. But I can tell you I gave everything I had: emotionally, insightfully, truthfully to the book and I think people who read it will see that.

Tennis Week: Was the actual writing process cathartic for you at any point?

Vince Spadea: At times, I was writing and I’d get really sentimental and I would get emotional or I would be writing and just cracking up at other times. So I would try to work off those emotions when they came. Writing is such a great art so you can be very specific when you write or you can be a little more abstract and play with the words. The McEnroe excerpt you’ve seen is an example where I tried to throw in a little bit of the daily life with the girl and then write about practicing with McEnroe and tell the readers what does McEnroe really look like when he shows up for practice, what does he say to you when you practice with him, what does he really play like now. So it’s anecdotal, it’s informative, it’s comic and you have a vague possible romance and try to bring all the elements together than compel the human soul. So reading the book, you experience the comic moments, the serious side, the triumph, the low points. Life on the tour is in essence a roller coaster ride whether you’re the young prodigy who made $20 million already or the established veteran, tennis takes its dips and makes its peak. I think the greatest theme of the book is the human connection and the way we think and feel and we can all relate to that on some level.

Tennis Week: When you write about other players whether it’s Agassi, Roddick, Blake or Fish, were you conscious of of the fact that if you write something too revealing or too critical you might then have to face these guys in a future match or did you just decide to let it fly and write the truth as you see it?

Vince Spadea: At first we let it fly and you paint the room as bright as possible and then you can adjust as you edit the book. We’ve adjusted in editing mainly when the material might have been too mundane or too boring or if it didn’t go anywhere. So in those cases you edit it. I think the truth is something that people will always respect so even if it might strain something if it is the truth you don’t change it or omit it. I’m not here to shock the world, but at the same time I think there will be a few eye-opening stories in this book. Controversy is something people make out of the slightest mishap that can occur. Basically, if it is not a motivating, self-help book, then it’s going to be controversial when you are truthful because human beings have both goodness and darkness.

Tennis Week: So is it fair to say it is an honest look at life on the ATP Tour, but you’re not trying to pull a Jose Canseco and expose anyone or any particular issue as Canseco did with the steroid scandal in baseball?

Vince Spadea: I wouldn’t say it is a Canseco type of book. I don’t think there is one profanity in the entire book, but that’s my personality: I don’t usually use profanity. I just feel like in general I was pretty candid about myself and I’m willing to put myself â€â€? in all the aspects â€â€? right there in the open in a very honest way. So when I walk down the street people who read the book will know what color boxer shorts I wear, they can probably predict what I am thinking or feeling right now because they know the way I think and feel from my writing.

Tennis Week: Vince, is exposing yourself to that extent a little scary? I mean, there are things I’ve done that I’m not proud of and certainly wouldn’t even want to tell one person let alone tell a large audience in a book. Was it scary to be that open?

Vince Spadea: Exposing yourself it is a little scary. Sometimes, I’d find myself thinking as I wrote: “Gosh, I wonder what my mom will think about this? I wonder what my friends will think about this.” So yes, it can be scary. There’s always a couple of things you hold onto, but this book doesn’t pull many punches at all. Obviously, I want to have a good influence and a good impact an set a good example, but the truth and just being real is the important thing and in being truthful you know you can’t make everyone in the world happy.

Tennis Week: A lot of times people see the glamour and successful side of tennis while watching tournament victories. Some of the things people don’t see is the grind of traveling the tour, the loneliness, the dealing with the pain and rejection of losing on a weekly basis and just how that life can complicate relationships and shatter self confidence. What is one of the most important things readers will learn about the life of a tennis pro from this book?

Vince Spadea: Definitely, it is a tough, challenging lifestyle. It’s hard to make friends and keep friends and stay balanced in your life. I’d say one of the things the book shows is just the fact that the winning and losing dictates so much of your life: in how you are feeling after the match and the next day and even how you treat people. The winning and losing definitely dictates so much of how you feel and what you do in the rest of your life. So you do see the somberness of it all and there’s one morbid entry where I was feeling sort of hopeless and without any direction at all. Then there’s other times when I was excited about the simplest thing and a lot of that emotion has to do with whether I was winning or losing while I was writing that part. So you get a feeling of how tennis players feel and think, what goes through their heads and how that mental part of it is a big challenge and a big aspect of this crazy life we lead.

Tennis Week: Vince, when you read and listen to the things people write and say about you there’s quite a range. Some people think of you as a grinder, as a veteran, as a rapper as a competitor, as a player with a comic side or as a quirky kind of character. This book is your opportunity to sort of let people see the real you. Were there any misconceptions you sought to straighten out about yourself in this book?

Vince Spadea: The fact that some people might have found me to be enigmatic and maybe some journalists may not totally know where I’m coming from, this kind of settled that score and I revealed who I really am. So by sharing who I really am then you get a chance to really like me or not. I’m trying to show the world who I am and what I am about and what I’ve learned and what inspires me and do it in a real truthful, authentic way and not through a journalist’s perspective or an indirect perspective, but directly from me.

Tennis Week: I’ve only read the one excerpt from the book that we posted on the web site, but I’m told you are very honest in the book. Not that you vilify other players, but you are revealing in talking about other players. Are you concerned this book might add fuel to the competitive fire of opponents since you will have to face some of these guys after the book comes out and did the potential response from your fellow players inhibit anything you wrote about? Have you received any input or response from fellow players?

Vince Spadea: It’s in the early stages and people are just starting to get to know it. As the months go on it will gain a little bit more momentum and I know I’ll get more feedback. Life is competitive and life is great and life is unfair at times. When you come out with a book like this you are not really sure how people will react. I can tell you that the best thing in everyone’s interest, and my own intention, was to tell the truth and be brutally honest and show who I am. I’m not out there to make enemies. It’s a hard, tough life being a professional tennis player. I’ve met a lot of great players and great people. I’m telling you these stories through my eyes as a real guy who has lived this. You just don’t know how it will be received. Hopefully, it’s going to be a great thing for tennis and kind of transcend the tennis world and not just be what it’s like to be a tennis player, but show the story of an interesting character who can tell a story truthfully, win tennis matches, lose tennis matches and bleed just the way you bleed. I try to write about lessons I’ve learned and do it with humor and intelligence and not just tell you what it’s like to face Agassi’s backhand. The book is more substantial and deeper than that. At the same time, it’s not War and Peace â€â€? it’s just war (laughs). It all blends together really well and there’s always gonna be some positive and negatives, but I can’t afford to care too much so in that sense it is like a stand-up comedian: three quarters of the room can be laughing really hard and the others don’t get it, but that’s the nature of it.

Tennis Week: Looking back on the Davis Cup issue you and Patrick McEnroe had, I’ve spoken to both you and Patrick about that since it happened and have always felt there was a little more to that story then either of you revealed at the time. Do you write about the Davis Cup debate you had with Patrick in this book?

Vince Spadea: I go into some of the Davis Cup issues with Pat McEnroe. I just felt like there were certain things that needed to be out there and what it really was and is and how everything transpired. I give you my honest opinions. It’s like always interesting to be out there and wonder and now this book makes you wonder less and makes you feel like you’ve been on the tour for years. In a sense, it’s like a handbook of what it’s like to be a pro tennis player. It makes you laugh and makes you sit and think and sometimes maybe even makes you sad. That’s a great mix, that’s what life on tour is about and that was my goal to give readers. So make sure you get eight hours of sleep before you read it because it is exciting. I guarantee you’ll laugh out loud, you’ll think a bit and you will definitely come away with some stories you will always remember.

PALM BEACH SPORT PSYCHOLOGIST ADDS WALK THERAPY AS OPTION

Dec 19, 2005 – JohnFMurray.com – Palm Beach based sport performance psychologist, has found that walking during sessions is beneficial and has added this to his treatment options. The Lake Trail where he walks is rated among the top 10 walking destinations in the world.

See The Press Release with a Photo of the Famous Walking Trail by Clicking Here

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

DR. MURRAY INTERVIEWS ARTHUR SCHOPENHAUER

Dec 17, 2005 – JohnFMurray.com – Feature – The famous philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer once stated that each new truth in history passes through three stages: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. And third, it is accepted as self-evident.

For many today, the truth about sport psychology and high performance psychology has entered the third phase. The benefits of the profession are accepted as self-evident.Â

Throughout history, good new ideas gained momentum slowly. But once they got going they were impossible to stop.

If you’ve read this far you are obviously a smart person and interested in how high performance psychology can help and how this progressive field can be introduced to more people.

We’ve already heard from Schopenhauer. Now I’d love to hear your views about what can be done to let more people know about the benefits of legitimate sport psychology services in helping athletes perform better and live more fulfilling lives.

I hope you are enjoying the many articles on this website. Keep sending me your great comments, or call me personally to discuss at 561-596-9898. Reach me by email: johnfmurray@mindspring.com.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

SIX DEGREES OF RESIGNATION

Dec 15, 2005 – SI.com (Inside the NBA) – Andrew Lawrence – In the NBA, Retiring is Only a Prelude to Returning – Former Miami Heat coach Stan Van Gundy now appears to have his priorities in order. At an age when most NBA coaches are hitting their stride, Van Gundy, 46, is calling it quits, abruptly resigning this week as coach of the Heat after 2 1/4 seasons.

His plan is to spend more time with a family with whom — between travel, practices and games — he was only going to spend an estimated 49 days this season. While 49 days at home with the wife and kids might seem like hard time to some, for Van Gundy the hard times came when he looked up into the American Airlines Arena stands and saw his 11-year-old son, Michael, waving to him in the distance. Or when his eldest child –14-year-old daughter Shannon — celebrated another birthday, reminding him of the few years he has left with her until she leaves the nest.

“I can’t believe that people have a big problem believing that someone would actually want to spend time with their family,” Van Gundy said at his farewell news conference. “I don’t know why that’s so hard to buy into.”

Perhaps because we’ve seen it before, seen the coach or player leave the sporting stage to spend more time at home, only to roll our eyes at the speed at which family soon retakes its place behind coaching or playing.

Almost six years ago to the day, Danny Ainge reached a similar crossroad when he resigned as coach of the Phoenix Suns to spend more time with his wife, Michelle, and their six children. When one of his sons (then a teenager) chided him for becoming too distant, “I couldn’t disagree with him,” Ainge said then. “It really [came] down to wanting to make a statement to my family that they are more important than my career.”

That lasted three years, at which point Ainge reunited with his other family, the Boston Celtics (the team he called home for eight seasons as a player), as its executive director of basketball operations.

When Ainge resigned in Phoenix, he entrusted the Suns to his top assistant, Scott Skiles, who at 35 became the NBA’s youngest head coach. In the six years since, Skiles has stopped working only once — not that it was by choice. (He was forced out after a 25-26 record in 2002.) Last year he led the Chicago Bulls to their first playoff berth since Michael Jordan left the building.

And both times His Airness left the building, it was for the family — or so he told us. When Jordan first retired in 1993, he regretted having not left sooner, admitting that his father, James, had urged him to hang ’em up after the Bulls had won their first title two years earlier. “Now that I’m here, it’s time to be a little unselfish in terms of spending more time with my wife and kids,” Jordan said. The following spring he was in Birmingham, Ala., shagging flies for the Barons before rejoining the Bulls near the end of the ’94-95 season.

When Jordan retired again in ’98, it was to give the carpool another driver. “Now I just want to enjoy my time with my family and friends, just recapture some of the time I gave away,” he said then. But in the end, the only thing he’d recapture was fame, joining the Washington Wizards in 2000 as president of basketball operations and suiting up for them in 2001 as a player.

When Jordan retired for the final time in ’03, the terms were much different. No one could blame him for going home; his wife, Juanita, had filed for divorce a year earlier. (They eventually reconciled in February ’02.)

Jordan hasn’t been the only former Bull willing to trade NBA fame for family. After Chicago’s sixth title, in ’98, coach Phil Jackson jetted off with his first wife, June, to Turkey, before retiring to his ranch in Montana. He didn’t stay there long, signing on with the Lakers in 1999. But there he was five seasons later, headed out the door again, this time flanked by four of his grown children after losing in a blowout to the Pistons in Game 5 of the NBA Finals. “They were hoping I could win a 10th [title] and retire,” Jackson said after the game.

They didn’t need to wait long for him to try again when Jackson re-signed to lead the Lakers last June.

“The problem with coaches and athletes is the perfectionism that pervades their personality,” says sports psychologist John F. Murray. “Nothing against family — you need family. But eventually they’re going to be itching for something more challenging.”

It was an issue Steve Kerr would struggle with after ending his 15-year playing career in ’03. “I was actually a little depressed for the first couple weeks,” says Kerr, a married father of three. “Which is ironic because I was usually depressed because I had to go through training camp. It’s sort of like a death of an era of your life. It can be sort of tough to move on.”

Kerr eventually settled into life after basketball; a job as an NBA analyst for TNT has allowed him to keep a hand in the game and also have enough time to lend a hand to his wife, Margot, in raising children, Nicolas, Madeline and Matthew.

Likewise, Jeff Van Gundy, Stan’s brother, used a career in television to tune out the chaos that had come with coaching in New York. He, too, retreated to TNT after resigning from the Knicks in midseason (citing a lack of focus after dealing with the deaths of two friends in the Sept. 11 attacks). When Jeff told his five-year-old daughter Mattie of his sudden plans to resign, she, like most New Yorkers, was shocked. “Does this mean you get to have lunch with me?” she asked. Of course, her father eventually returned to the bench two years later with the Houston Rockets.

Meanwhile, Uncle Stan will fill out his hours hunting around Miami for holiday lights for the house. This Christmas will mark Stan’s first at home in almost a decade. It should be a welcome change of pace for a man whose life has been consumed by the game from the start — the penance for being born the son of a coach. When Stan was 11 and his father, Bill, was too sick to scout his next opponent, the task fell to Stan, Jeff and their mother, Cindy, to watch the game and write the report. When he returns to the Heat, it’ll be as a consultant who scouts free agents and college players. More important, it’ll be less time-consuming. “I don’t think they need me, to be quite honest,” Van Gundy said of his young brood. “They’re doing fine without me. But I need them.”

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

MURRAY 4TH YEAR RUNNING ON BLOOMBERG RADIO

Dec 14, 2005 – Updated MPI Scores from NFL Playoffs. Bloomberg Radio is almost becoming the flagship station for Dr. John F. Murray each year before the Super Bowl.

Dr. Murray has been Invited as a guest to be interviewed for 4th Straight Year on Bloomberg Radio (Bob Goldsholl’s Bloomberg on the Ball) to Discuss NFL Teams Prior to Super Bowl and Give his MPI Ratings (showing total performance of teams including for mental factors, extremely accurate 3 years in a row now). Exact details and air times are forthcoming, but it has aired in the past on the Saturday before the Super Bowl 4-6 times throughout the day.

Bloomberg is heard in the New York metro area on WBBR and internationally on satellite radio. Dr. Murray’s MPI ratings and discussions prior to the Super Bowl have now been heard by over 500 radio stations and a handful of TV stations, and the MPI ratings have been more accurate than the official spread in forecasting the performance of the teams each year this has been done.

More information about the MPI can be found at the following Links:

MPI Article Derived from Radio Interviews on Bloomberg Radio and CNN Radio

Washington Post Calls Dr. Murray the “Freud of Football” in describing MPI

Football Section of JohnFMurray.com with many more articles and audios on the MPI.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PSYCHOLOGIST SELLS IDEA ON EBAY

AuctionBytes.com – Dec 8, 2005 – Ina Steiner – Sport performance psychologist John F. Murray auctioned the idea of “Confidence” on eBay. Bidding opened at $10, and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Other unusual items that have been listed on eBay include someone’s soul, someone’s virginity, and a house complete with a wife.

https://www.JohnFMurray.com

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRECEDENT-SETTING AUCTION OF AN ‘IDEA’ ON EBAY IS BOUGHT FOR $250

PALM BEACH, Fla. Dec. 8, 2005 – When sport performance psychologist John F. Murray decided to auction the idea of “Confidence” on eBay he had no idea how much interest this auction would draw. Top athletes and film stars use mental coaches, but he didn’t know whether the general public would pay for what might be called nothing more than an idea.

Bidding opened at $10 and after fifteen bids this idea sold for $250, representing perhaps the first time an “idea” has been sold in an auction. The winner is a recreational tennis player in New York. She will receive one hour of mental coaching by Dr. Murray. See https://www.JohnFMurray.com.

“I had a hunch this would draw some attention since so many are beginning to recognize the value of confidence and mental training. The auction testified to broad-based interest,” said Dr. Murray, who has coached some of the top athletes in the world. “The public response justified my hunch.”

The auction was started to demonstrate public and professional interest in training the brain. “We’ve gone almost as far as we can go physically, but mental training is a territory with unlimited potential for improvement in business, sports, or life,” said Murray, who has spoken on this topic on numerous talk shows.

Many pro athletes, teams, businesses, and organizations receive the benefits of mental coaching, but most people are still often surprised to know that these services even exist as there are few legitimate performance psychologists or other professionals to provide these services.

Confidence is described as an umbrella term reflecting all the thoughts, feelings, actions and sensations reflecting self-belief and expectations of success. Top tennis professional Vincent Spadea spoke on national television about the benefits of mental coaching to reverse the longest losing streak in tennis history and return to top 20 in the world.

For more information about “mental training” and Dr. Murray go to https://www.JohnFMurray.com.

Contact:
John F. Murray, PhD
TEL: 561-596-9898
FAX: 561-805-8662

Clinical and Sports Performance Psychology Services


SOURCE John F. Murray, PhD
-0- 12/08/2005
/EDITORS’ ADVISORY: Murray available for interview./
/CONTACT: John F. Murray, 561-596-9898, or fax, 561-805-8662/

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

WHY CHEAT IN GOING THE DISTANCE?

Newsday – Dec 6, 2005 – John Hanc – Honest runners say there’s no reward in taking shortcuts. John Hanc is a regular contributor to Newsday.

Janese Decal was driving home from work when she stopped at a Freeport bank to withdraw some cash. As she walked back to her car, a man on a bicycle came pedaling out of the darkness and tried to grab her pocketbook. When Decal resisted, he slammed her down on the pavement of Sunrise Highway before riding off with $260. Decal suffered a severe contusion on her left leg, a bruised femur and a gash in her head that required three stitches.

Three weeks later, against the advice of almost everybody, Decal completed the ING New York City Marathon. “It just meant a lot to me,” said the North Bellmore woman, who – because of her injuries – was forced to walk much of the 26.2 mile distance.

For the 26-year-old marathoner, part of the motivation to compete in the event comes from her involvement in the Long Island chapter of Team in Training, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s marathon fundraising group. To her, running represents a link to a network of like-minded friends, driven by a desire to go the distance, get in shape and, in the process, raise money for a good cause.

So when Decal heard that a group of women from a similar program was disqualified for cheating by cutting the course in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., she was horrified. “I don’t know how they could live with themselves after doing that,” she said.

A race for amateurs

With almost 20,000 finishers this year, the Marine Corps Marathon – held on Oct. 30, the week before New York’s – is the country’s fourth-largest 26.2-mile race. Unlike New York’s, it is a strictly amateur race; there is no prize money. Because of that, the event calls itself “The People’s Marathon.”

So what kind of people would cheat themselves?

At the center of the controversy is a Toronto-based group called JeansMarines, a nonprofit group that was founded by Dr. Jean Marmoreo and her husband, Bob Ramsay, after they completed their first Marine Corps Marathon in 2001. On its Web site, the organization describes itself as “a group of Canadian women who dare ourselves to do the impossible; to run the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. … no matter how fearful, reluctant or out of shape we were when we began. In the process … we change in ways we never thought possible.”

Cheating presumably was never part of the JeansMarines training program. Yet, that is exactly what the group admitted doing. Marine Corps Marathon race director Rick Nealis said eight members of JeansMarines – out of 200 from the group who participated in the race – were directed by Marmoreo to take a shortcut near the 10-mile mark and then to rejoin the race course at about mile 14. This would enable them to reach Washington’s 14th Street Bridge at mile 22 before the mandatory 51/2-hour cutoff time. (At that point, the bridge would open to vehicular traffic.) After taking the shortcut, the women supposedly continued on and completed the remaining 12 miles of the course. (Race organizers are also looking into allegations that another 22 members of JeansMarines also cut the course at a different location.)

‘We made a mistake’Nealis said he heard about the course-cutting from an eyewitness. He and his staff then analyzed the data from computerized chips marathon participants wear to keep track of their time and concluded that the eight women had, indeed, cut the course.

Meanwhile, when bloggers picked up the story and contacted her, Marmoreo called Nealis and admitted that she had encouraged her “Marines” to take the shortcut.

As a result, JeansMarines have been banned from participating in the 2006 Marine Corps Marathon. Marmoreo and her husband issued an apology on their Web site. “We made a mistake,” the statement read. “We’re sorry. And we’ve taken corrective action. … No shortcutting will be encouraged, allowed or tolerated.”

Marmoreo asked the eight women to return their finishers medals. “They feel they’ve accomplished a great deal in terms of fitness and weight loss,” said Ramsay. But “they certainly understand the reasons for [returning the medals].”

Others in the marathon world may not be as understanding. “The sport has gotten a bit of the black eye,” said New York City Marathon spokesman Richard Finn. “This raises the idea that [course-cutting] goes on more prevalently than it actually does.” Still, he says, “you shake your head and wonder why they did it.”

Decal says she can understand the urge to want to quit in the middle of a marathon, but not to cheat. “I was going to drop out at mile 16,” she said. “But I wouldn’t have walked back on the course further along in the race and then accepted a medal for doing less than the full distance. There’s no honor in that.”

To keep goals, set them wisely

To sports psychologist Dr. John Murray, the Marine Corps Marathon cheating incident, in which a group of eight back-of-the-pack participants admitted taking a 4-mile shortcut along the 26.2 mile course, illustrates an important point about goal-setting.

“Goals should be primarily based on performance and process and much less on outcome,” says Murray, who is based in West Palm Beach, Fla. “That helps put the sport where it should … as a healthy outlet for fitness.”

That’s worth remembering if you’re planning to set fitness and health-related “resolutions” for the New Year. A goal of “I will lose 25 pounds by mid-February” is not only unrealistic, it’s outcome-based.

A better and more achievable objective would be to go to the gym consistently or to make some specific dietary modifications and stick with them.

Here are some other goal-setting tips for fitness:

Set specific, short-term goals: “Looking and feeling better are good long-term goals,” says personal trainer and author Douglas Brooks.

A more tangible, short-term goal, he says, might be to exercise three times a week. “This is realistic and achievable and will serve to motivate you until you reach your loftier or more ambitious goals.”

Keep your workouts at reasonable lengths: There’s a tendency for people who are getting back into the gym to overdo it – to work out every night, for an hour or more. More often than not, that leads to injury and premature burnout.

Write down your goals and keep track of your progress: Studies have shown that people who keep a training diary are more likely to stick with a program.

Stay flexible, but stay with it: The Web site mygoals.com says that continual modification of our goals is now recognized as a key to reaching them. So don’t be afraid to adjust and amend your fitness goals. You don’t have to stick with the program, just make sure you stick with a program.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.

PRESIDENT BUSH THIS WEEKEND

JohnFMurray.com – Dec 2, 2005 – News Update – Former president George Bush, 81, will play in Chris Evert’s charity event this weekend at the Delray Beach Tennis Center in South Florida. Bush, an avid tennis fan, is a longtime supporter of her tournament, which has raised more than $13 million to fight drug abuse and help neglected children. Others in the field include NBC Dateline anchor Stone Phillips, Grammy winner Michael W. Smith, actors Scott Foley, Alan Thicke and Jon Lovitz, and tennis players Lindsay Davenport, Tommy Haas, Mary Joe Fernandez, Justin Gimelstob, Vince Spadea and Luke and Murphy Jensen.

Dr. John F. Murray will attend the Friday night cocktail party at the Boca Raton Hotel and Club accompanied by a client.

Dr. John F. Murray is a sports psychologist and clinical psychologist providing sports psychology and counseling services based in Palm Beach, Florida.